Immunisations and Vaccinations

Immunisations and Vaccinations

Vaccinations, also called immunisations, are one of the most effective measures to protect individuals and the community from serious diseases – they have saved countless lives.

A number of vaccines are offered free of charge by the NHS, most of which are given during early childhood. Vaccines are also offered for people in special risk groups, and for those travelling abroad.

What vaccine when?

Here’s a checklist of the vaccines that are routinely offered to everyone in the UK and the age they should ideally be given.

2 months:

  • Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib, a bacterial infection that can cause severe pneumonia or meningitis in young children) given as a 5-in-1 single jab known as DTaP/IPV/Hib
  • Pneumococcal infection

3 months:

  • 5-in-1, second dose (DTaP/IPV/Hib)
  • Meningitis C

4 months:

  • 5-in-1, third dose (DTaP/IPV/Hib)
  • Pneumococcal infection, second dose
  • Meningitis C, second dose

Around 12 months:

  • Meningitis C, third dose
  • Hib, fourth dose (Hib/MenC given as a single jab)

Around 13 months:

  • MMR (measles, mumps and rubella), given as a single jab
  • Pneumococcal infection, third dose

3 years and 4 months, or soon after:

  • MMR second jab
  • Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and polio (DtaP/IPV), given as a 4-in-1 pre-school booster

Around 12-13 years:

Around 13-18 years:

  • Diphtheria, tetanus and polio booster (Td/IPV), given as a single jab

65 and over:

  • Flu (every year) Pneumococcal

To find out more about vaccinations, go to NHS Choices Vaccinations