February 2018

Contents

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Welcome

Hello,

Welcome to February’s edition of ‘in touch’.

In this issue we’re excited to tell you about a new Children and Adolescent Mental Health service that starts on 1 April. Over 200 people across Wiltshire, Bath and North East Somerset and Swindon helped to shape the service which will support young people aged 0-18 years.

NHS England is working with NHS Clinical Commissioners on a public consultation to reduce prescribing of over the counter medicines for minor, short-term health concerns. Drugs like paracetamol can cost the NHS up to three times more on prescription than if patients bought them directly from a supermarket. The results from the consultation will inform national guidance on how such drugs are available in the future. What are your thoughts on buying some medication over the counter? Share your views by completing the survey.

Over the coming months we’ll be focusing on cancer types and the common signs to look out for. 

It’s very easy to ignore symptoms and put off going to see your doctor, but if you are worried you should book an appointment with your doctor straight away.

It may not be anything serious, but if it is cancer it’s important to find it early. See below for the campaigns we’re highlighting in this edition.

While Winter hasn’t quite left us yet the days are gradually getting longer and the sun is starting to brighten up our skies – Spring is nearly here!

Linda

Back to top ..

In the news!

New service to support children and young people with their emotional wellbeing

The views of over 200 individuals from across Bath and North East Somerset, Swindon and Wiltshire have helped shape a modern service for children and young people with emotional wellbeing and mental health problems.

The new Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) service starts on 1 April 2018 and will be delivered by Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust. The service be providing targeted and specialist mental health and wellbeing support to children and young people aged 0-18 years, which includes having timely access to an integrated system of co-ordinated and effective promotion, prevention, early intervention and community support and treatment.

Ted Wilson, Director of Community Services and Joint Commissioning for Wiltshire CCG said: “With valuable input from young people across Wiltshire, Bath and North East Somerset and Swindon we have commissioned a mental health service that will better suit their needs, be easier for them to access and will provide improved advice and support.”

National Survey shows improvements in women’s experiences of maternity care

Most women are having a positive experience of maternity care and treatment with the NHS, according to a survey of more than 18,000 people in England.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) survey results reveal responses from women who had given birth in February 2017 in services run by 130 NHS trusts across the country.

Women were asked questions about all aspects of their maternity care from the first time they saw a clinician or midwife, during labour and birth, through to the care provided at home in the weeks following the arrival of their baby. The results highlighted improvements in areas such as choice on where to give birth, quality of information and access to help and support after giving birth.

The full results for England as well as individual results for each trust are available on the CQC’s website.

  Back to top..

Focus on cancer!

More than one in three people in England will develop some form of cancer during their lifetime.

Cancer can start almost anywhere in the human body, which is made up of trillions of cells. Normally cells grow and divide to form new cells when the body needs them. When cancer develops, old or damaged cells survive when they should die, and new cells form when they are not needed. These extra cells can divide without stopping and may form growths called tumours. These cancerous cells can invade and destroy surrounding healthy tissue, including organs.

There are more than 200 different types of cancer, and each one is diagnosed and treated in a particular way. The four most common types of cancer diagnosed in England are:

Spotting the signs

It is important to be aware of any unexplained changes to your body. If you notice any changes to your body’s normal processes or unusual, unexplained symptoms – such as the sudden appearance of a lump, blood in your urine, or a change to your usual bowel habits, it’s important to see your doctor so they can investigate. The chances are it is nothing serious, but it might be something that needs attention and if diagnosed earlier, treatment can be a lot more successful.

Click here for more information on cancer and spotting the signs and symptoms.

We’re helping to raise awareness of cancer, so keep an eye out for information on the following campaigns in the next few issues of ‘in touch’:

Prostate Cancer Awareness Month
In the UK, about one in eight men will get prostate cancer at some point in their lives.

Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month
Ovarian cancer is the biggest gynaecological killer of UK women, as most women are diagnosed once the cancer has spread which makes treatment more challenging.

Be clear on cancer – breast cancer in women over 70 
In England, one in three women who get breast cancer are aged 70 or over.

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in England with around 44,300 women diagnosed each year, of which around 13,500 (a third) are aged 70 and over. The older you are – the more likely you are to get it.

This campaign aims to get more women with breast cancer diagnosed at an early stage by raising awareness of the symptoms so it’s important to get to know how your breasts look and feel normally, so that you will find it easier to spot something unusual.

A lump isn’t the only sign of breast cancer. If you do notice any changes to your breast you should make an appointment to see your doctor straight away. It might not be anything serious, but if it is, getting a diagnosis early can make a real difference.

Back to top

Have your say!

Conditions for which over the counter items should not routinely be prescribed in primary care

NHS England has launched a public consultation on reducing prescribing of over-the-counter medicines for 33 minor, short-term health concerns.

From June 2016 until June 2017 the NHS spent approximately £569 million on prescriptions for medicines which could have been purchased over the counter from a pharmacy, or other outlets such as a supermarket.

These prescriptions include items for a condition:

  • That is considered to be self-limiting and so does not need treatment as it will heal of its own accord;
  • Which lends itself to self-care, i.e. that the person suffering does not normally need to seek medical care but may decide to seek help with symptom relief from a local pharmacy and use an over the counter medicine

NHS England has partnered with NHS Clinical Commissioners to carry out the consultation, which is intended to help produce a national framework for CCGs to use.

The consultation is seeking your views on the proposals and is open until 14 March 2018.

Back to top..

Campaign 

Know the signs of a stroke and act F.A.S.T.

We are encouraging you to learn the F.A.S.T. test to help you identify the early signs of a stroke and save more lives.

 

 

 

The F.A.S.T. test identifies the three most common symptoms of a stroke and the right action to take:

Face: Can the person smile? Has their mouth or eye drooped?

Arms: Can the person raise both arms?

Speech: Can the person speak clearly and understand what you are saying?

Time: call 999

If you recognise any single one of these symptoms of stroke, in yourself or others – CALL 999 straightaway. The sooner somebody who is having a stroke gets urgent medical attention, the better their chances of a good recovery.

Your pharmacy can help!

Your pharmacy team can help you with minor health concerns. Visit our website to find out where your nearest pharmacy is: http://www.wiltshireccg.nhs.uk/local-services/pharmacies

Community pharmacists and pharmacy technicians are qualified healthcare professionals who can offer clinical advice and over the counter medicines to effectively and safely manage a range of minor health concerns.

 

Including:

  • Sore throats
  • Coughs
  • Colds
  • Tummy troubles
  • Teething

Every pharmacist is trained in managing minor illnesses and providing health and wellbeing advice, so they are the right person to see for minor health concerns.

With over 12,000 pharmacies open every day of the week in England, and many offering extended opening hours in the evenings and weekends, it is easy to find a pharmacy close to you.

Pharmacists are healthcare experts who can give you clinical advice, right there and then, and if your symptoms are more serious, they can ensure you get the help you need...

Follow us

You can find Wiltshire CCG on social media – follow us and keep up to date with our latest news.

www.facebook.com/NHSWiltshireCCG www.twitter.com/NHSWiltshireCCG www.pinterest.com/NHSWiltshireCCG
Back to top

.. 

 

January 2018

Contents

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Welcome

Happy New Year!

The cold weather is still biting at our heels and as you will have seen in recent press coverage, the NHS is under massive strain due to winter pressures, particularly due to the high instances of flu and norovirus. In this issue of ‘in touch’ we’re focusing on how you can help to look after yourselves and your families and treat common health complaints early. 

Many winter ailments can take up to two weeks or more to shake off. You shouldn’t need to see your GP unless symptoms become particularly severe and if you make an appointment, there are other healthcare staff that can help you, meaning GPs are freed up to see those who really need them – take a look at our primary care leaflet to find out more.

There are a number of things you can do to help yourself before needing to see a GP and help ease the pressures on our local health system at the same time. Ensuring you have a well-stocked medicine cabinet at home will help you to treat simple coughs and colds early; seeking advice from a pharmacist at the first-sign of illness may mean you don’t need a GP appointment as well and contacting NHS 111 for advice will help direct you to the right healthcare service.

Flu symptoms are still doing the rounds; it’s very infectious and easily spread by coughs and sneezes. The NHS Catch it. Kill it. Bin it. campaign gives you some great guidance on how to reduce the spread of the flu virus, read the article on page 3 to find out more.

Spring is just around the corner, but until it arrives let’s help keep those winter bugs at bay!

Linda

Back to top ..

In the news!

Winter pressures means deferral of non-urgent inpatient operations

NHS England has issued guidance in line with new Winter Pressures Protocol to hospitals as they had been under sustained pressure over the Winter period.

To help hospitals handle the sustained pressure, one of the steps has been to defer all non-urgent inpatient elective care operations until 31 January 31.  Cancer operations and time-critical procedures will go ahead as planned.

These steps will ensure patients in hospitals receive the best possible care over this challenging period.

We are asking the public to call NHS 111 if they need to obtain clinical advice when they start to feel ill and it’s not urgent, which will allow staff in A&E to focus on the sickest patients.

Read the official letter from Pauline Philip, National Director, Urgent and Emergency Care, NHS England and NHS Improvements to systems and press statement here.

Meet the team

We have developed a ’Your primary healthcare team’ leaflet to help you get the right appointment for your needs.

You may not always need to see your doctor.  Many surgeries employ other healthcare staff such as nurses, pharmacists and emergency care practitioners who can help you. Speak to your Practice receptionist, or visit the Practice’s website to find out who could help you.

Each GP practice also has a range of staff including receptionists,, administration support staff and practice managers who work to ensure you have a great patient experience.

Struck down by Norovirus? Stay at home!

When it comes to sickness and diarrhoea, looking after yourself at home is often be the best option.

Norovius is particularly widespread at this time of year, and diarrhoea and vomiting are often among its symptoms.  It’s also very easily spread through contaminated surfaces and close contact with other people.

There is not cure for norovirus but it usually clears up by itself within a few days, and the best way to recover is through self-care at home – get plenty of rest, drink lots of fluids and wash your hands regularly with soap and water.  If you need guidance on what you can do to help yourself get better, speak to your local pharmacist – they can provide quick advice without you having to wait for an appointment or sit in a waiting room sharing your misfortune with others!

If you are worried your stomach complaint is something more than a simple bug, the pharmacist will be able to let you know if you need to see a doctor. You can also call NHS 111 and a trained call handler will talk you through the best course of action.

For more information on norovirus visit:  www.nhs.uk

Read more news articles here.

Back to top

Have your say!

Help NHS England improve services for patients and take part in their survey

Equality Delivery System Grading

The Equality Delivery System (EDS2) is a tool which helps NHS organisations make sure services are fair for all patients and communities and supports NHS organisations to make sure that the people who work for them are treated fairly and can apply for a lot of different jobs at all levels.

Help them know how well they are doing for people from all backgrounds by taking part in their survey – closes on 18 February 2018.

Back to top

..

Campaign 

Catch it. Bin it. Kill it.

Cold weather can be seriously bad for your health.  That’s why it’s important to look after yourself, especially during the winter.  If you do start to feel unwell, even if it’s a cough or cold, don’t wait until it gets more serious – seek advice from your pharmacist.

If your cold develops into flu, which is very infectious and is spread by germs from coughs and sneezes – it can live on hands or surfaces for 24 hours.

To help reduce the risk of spreading germs – CATCH IT. BIN IT. KILL IT.

CATCH IT
Use tissues to trap germs when you cough or sneeze

BIN IT
Germs can live for several hours on tissues – bin used tissue as quickly as possible

KILL IT
Hands can transfer germs to any surface you touch – wash your hands often with warm water and soap

Most of us will catch a cold at some point during the winter months, leaving us with a runny nose, sneezing, sore throat and a cough.  No one enjoys having a cold and by following these simple steps you could avoid passing the virus to someone else.

 

Change4Life – Nutrition

These days kids are eating too much sugar, saturated fat and salt and in England children are eating nearly three times the recommended amount of sugar. Surprisingly, half the sugar they consume comes from snacks and sugary drinks.

Eating too much sugar can lead to harmful fat building up inside and serious health problems, including painful tooth decay.

To help reduce the amount of sugar children are consuming Change4Life is encouraging parents to choose healthier snacks choices for them by introducing a new simple tip – ‘Look for 100 calorie snacks, two a day max.’

You can also sign up to join Change4Life to receive money-off vouchers for healthier snacks and helpful tips and ideas.

Visit the Change4Life website for more details.

..

Follow us

You can find Wiltshire CCG on social media – follow us and keep up to date with our latest news.

www.facebook.com/NHSWiltshireCCG www.twitter.com/NHSWiltshireCCG www.pinterest.com/NHSWiltshireCCG
Back to top

.. 

 

December 2017

Contents

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Welcome

Hello,

As winter takes hold, we’ve focused this edition of ‘in touch’ on articles offering you advice on how you can help you and your loved ones to stay well during the colder weather.

Winter can be challenging, with the cold and damp weather making us more vulnerable to illness, particularly flu, so it’s really important to take care of your health. If you’re eligible for a free flu jab and haven’t had it yet, pop along to your local pharmacist, or make an appointment with your GP to have it. 

We also know how worrying it can be when your child falls ill, even more so when your local surgery is closed. We’ve launched a new out of hours GP service for children under 10 years in South Wiltshire. It’s at Salisbury Walk in Centre and parents can book a same day appointment for their child by calling NHS 111.

We also support a free mobile app called HANDi app which provides expert advice to parents and carers on common childhood illnesses – download it free from the ITunes App Store and Google Play Store.

Since our last newsletter we have been out and about in Wiltshire talking to you about diabetes. Your feedback will help us to design and provide a diabetes toolkit for helping you to manage your diabetics at home.

Keep well this winter and enjoy the festive season!

Linda

Back to top ..

In the news!

Out of hours service for children in South Wiltshire

An out of hours GP service for children aged 0 – 10 years in Salisbury and South Wiltshire means parents can now book a same day appointment to see a GP at the Salisbury Walk in health centre.

The extended service will provide out of hours GP health advice and treatment for minor illnesses and injuries from Monday to Friday between 6.30pm – 10pm, and will provide parents with a local alternative to A&E when their child is ill.

Parents should ring 111 to access the service. 

Virgin Care’s Wiltshire Children’s Community Services complete moves to hubs

 

Wiltshire Children’s Community Services, run by Virgin Care, has completed its move to four new, purpose designed spaces dedicated for both colleagues and children and families in Wiltshire, which delivers a milestone on the organisations plans in implementing its five year roadmap to deliver improvements in patient care. 

These sites will be where patient-centred care is organised and coordinated, while service delivery will be either in universal settings such as schools, children’s centres, families own homes or Virgin Care’s dedicated clinical space.

Ted Wilson, Community and Joint Commissioning Director of Wiltshire CCG, said: “We are pleased the move to the four community hubs in Wiltshire will enable children’s community health staff to provide coordinated, person-centred care, designed around the individual needs of the children and to support them when they need help.”

 

Patients have a responsibility to be ‘fit, willing and able’

Wiltshire patients are being encouraged to be ‘fit, willing and able’ this winter to ensure planned outpatient clinics and operations run as smoothly as possible over the winter period. 

We are working with GPs and hospital clinicians across Bath and North East Somerset, Swindon and Wiltshire to help guide patients through their treatment pathways and in turn reduce the number of instances where patients do not turn up for their appointments, or decline required appointments, or dates for planned operations. 

The campaign focuses on ensuring patients are:

Fit – aware of their planned treatment and are in their best health to get the maximum benefit from it.  This can include maintaining a healthy weight and stopping smoking.

Willing – clear about what their treatment entails and are willing to sign up to it at the outset

Able – committed to attending future appointments and understand that this may require flexibility on their part.

Read more news articles here.

Back to top

Have your say!

Make a difference: join your Patient Participation Group

Would you like to get involved and make a difference to the care patients receive?

Your GP surgery has its own team of people who provide a voice for all patients on the practice’s list and work with the doctors and practice staff to improve the way things are run.  

That team is called a PPG – a Patient Participation Group.

Just ask at reception at your GP surgery to find out how you could join your PPG.

Have your say on the organ donor ‘opt out’ consultation

People who donate their organs and tissue after they die help save thousands of lives in England each year. However, 3 people die a day due to lack of suitable organs. Under current rules, a person who has died can only be an organ donor if they have agreed to it when they were alive.

If the law changes, people will be considered willing to be an organ donor unless they have opted out.  This would increase the number of organs donated and save more lives.

 

The Department of Health’s ‘opt out’ consultation is now live – take a few minutes to share your views on the proposed new rules.

 

Diabetes Feedback

Thanks to all who completed our online diabetes survey featured in last month’s newsletter, did you spot our team speaking to patients about diabetes in supermarkets in Chippenham, Trowbridge and Salisbury? The team are now working on the diabetes resource pack which will be available in Spring 2018. 

Knowledge is the key to successfully managing your diabetes, our free patient education programmes are available for Type 1 and Type 2  patients and  take place all over the county so there’s bound to be one near you, speak to your diabetes Doctor or Nurse for information on how to book.

Feedback from participants on the Type 1 Freedom For Life course said:

  • “Can vary meals more – some meals more carbohydrate: some meals less”
  • “Support and at last, some help”
  • “Not as anxious about eating a variety of foods.  More knowledge, more freedom”

This is what recent participants have said about our Type 2 X-pert course:

  • “A very informative programme which has already aided management of my diabetes by better information about diet.”
  • “A very interesting and informative course which was presented in a friendly and easy to understand manner. Many thanks to all presenters.”
  • “Excellent course. I have gained so much from your sessions. Thank you.”

 Support to prevent Type 2 Diabetes

The National Diabetes Prevention Programme has been launched in Wiltshire. Type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented and is not linked to lifestyle, however, Type 2 diabetes is largely preventable through lifestyle changes. If you are identified at risk of becoming diabetic your GP can refer you to the programme where you will be supported to maintain a healthy weight and be more active, and significantly reduce the risk of developing the condition.

Diabetes Myth of the month: People with diabetes should eat 'diabetic' foods
‘Diabetic’ labelling tends to be used on sweets, biscuits and similar foods that are generally high in fat, especially saturated fat and calories. Diabetes UK does not recommend eating ‘diabetic’ foods, including diabetic chocolate, because they still affect your blood glucose levels, they are expensive and they can give you diarrhoea. So, if you are going to treat yourself – you should go for the real thing.

Back to top

..

Campaign – Stay well this winter

Winter can be seriously bad for our health, especially for people aged 65 or older and people with long term conditions.

The cold and damp weather, ice, snow and high winds can all aggravate any existing health problems and make us more vulnerable to illnesses that are more common in winter.

We have put together some handy information to help you stay well this winter.

Have you had your flu vaccination?
Flu strikes in winter and can be far more serious than you think – it can lead to serious complications such as bronchitis and pneumonia and in some instances it can be deadly.

That’s why it’s important that people who are at increased risk from flu, have their free flu vaccination.

If you are:

Pregnant
Aged 65 or over
Have a long term health condition
Living in a residential care home
A carer Living with someone who is immunocompromised
Are a frontline health or social care worker

This year more children are being vaccinated, and children over 6 months old with a long term health condition, and children aged two and three are offered the vaccination in general practice.

Children in reception class and school years 1, 2 3 & 4 will be offered the vaccine at school.

If you’re eligible for a free flu vaccination and not yet had it, speak to your surgery and make an appointment today!

 

Keeping warm as the temperature drops!

It’s important to keep warm in winter – both indoors and outdoors

Heat your home to at least 18C (65F) 
especially if you are not very mobile, are 65 or over, or have a health condition 
during the day you may prefer your living room to be slightly warmer

Keep your bedroom window closed at night 
breathing cold air can be bad for your health as it increases the risk of chest conditions

Keep active when you are indoors 
try not to sit still for more than an hour or so, get up and stretch your legs
even moderate exercise can help keep you warm

Wear several layers of light clothes 
light layers trap warm air better than one bulky layer and help to maintain body heat

Draw your curtains at dusk, and keep doors closed 
to block out draughts and keep the warm in

Have at least one hot meal a day 
eating regularly helps to keep you warm; and make sure you have lots of hot drinks

 

Make sure you are receiving all the help you are entitled to – Warm and Safe Wiltshire

 

Get advice from your pharmacist

Winter can make existing health problems worse, so if you feel you are coming down with something, even if it’s just a cough or cold, don’t wait until it gets worse – act quickly and get advice from a pharmacist.

Pharmacists are fully qualified to advise you on the best course of action when you start to feel unwell, and this can be the best and quickest way to help you recover and feel healthy.

Most pharmacies now have a private consultation area, so you can discuss your health issues in confidence and you don’t need to make an appointment.

 

Is your medicine cabinet fit for the winter?
Be prepared for common ailments by keeping a well stocked medicine cabinet at home.Always keep medicines out of the reach and sight of children

 

Back to top

..

Follow us

You can find Wiltshire CCG on social media – follow us and keep up to date with our latest news.

www.facebook.com/NHSWiltshireCCG www.twitter.com/NHSWiltshireCCG www.pinterest.com/NHSWiltshireCCG
Back to top

..