April 2018

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Welcome

Hello,

Welcome to April’s edition of ‘in touch’.

Our NHS will soon be celebrating its 70th birthday. All those years ago who would ever have imagined what healthcare would look like now.  The illnesses that we can treat and many of the operations and procedures that needed weeks of recovery have become routine, done in a day and carried out at a local hospital or even a GP surgery!

In this issue the very nature of how and where care is provided, whether that’s in our hospitals, community clinics or GP surgeries continues to evolve. We want to mark this occasion by sharing your memories and reminiscences of the NHS, if you have a story or photo to share, please get in touch – NHS70.wccg@nhs.net.

Earlier this month it was confirmed that the GP led health centre for Devizes can move to its next phase, which is great news. There still remains a considerable amount of detailed planning work to be undertaken and we will keep you updated about the development in future issues of ‘ in touch’.

We are discussing end of life care in this issue. Talking about death is still a taboo subject that so many people choose to ignore. However, talking about death as well as planning for it may not be easy, but it can help us to make the most of life and spare our loved ones from making difficult decisions on our behalf.  

With the arrival of Spring and long awaited sunshine I hope you are enjoying getting out and about in the Wiltshire countryside. We’ve included some information about how to recognise ‘ticks’ and precautions to take to prevent you from being bitten because they are prevalent at this time of year. We hope you find it useful.

Linda

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In the news!

Major step forward to development of Devizes Health Centre

Earlier this month, after a commitment of £7million to funding by NHS Property Services , it was confirmed that the GP led health centre for Devizes can move to its next phase.

Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group is leading the project which aims to deliver significant benefit to patients care by creating a modern and sustainable facility for the people of Devizes and the surrounding areas. The commitment to funding from NHS Property Services to fund the construction costs comes as outline planning permission for the development from Wiltshire Council is expected later this month.

Dr Richard Sandford-Hill, Chairman of Wiltshire CCG and lead GP for the project said:

“It’s really exciting to see that the Devizes Health Centre project is taking a significant step forward, and I’m delighted on behalf of the five Devizes GP practices and the CCG. The commitment from NHS Property Services means it’s all systems “go” to work towards the implementation of this important, long awaited scheme that will provide modern, fit for purpose premises for the delivery of healthcare for the people of the Devizes community area. There’s still a lot of work to do, and we look forward to the outcome of the Outline Planning Application, but we’re extremely confident now that we’re well on the way to achieving what we set out to do on behalf of our patients”.

The next step in the project will involve us concluding the outline business case, including a commitment to fund the future costs of running the health centre. If the outline business case is approved, work on developing the detailed design of the scheme can be begin to inform the full business case, which would then need to be approved by us and NHS England.

The health centre development is part of a wider scheme that involves the release of land at Marshall Road for housing, and, in due course, the outdated community hospital in the town.

We will keep you updated on the development of the health centre in future issues of the newsletter.

Help us celebrate 70 years of the NHS

This year marks the 70th anniversary of the National Health Service as it celebrates its birthday on 5 July 2018.

It’s an organisation woven into the very fabric of our way of life with each and every one of us using its services in some shape or form at some time.

To get here from 1948, the NHS has been constantly evolving and adapting to meet changing needs and expectations. All those years ago who would ever have imagined that we would be able to map the human brain, carry out heart transplants and immunise against so many diseases.

We want to mark the occasion by sharing local people’s memories and reminiscences of the NHS – either because they have worked for the service, or have received NHS treatment over the last 70 years. In particular, we are keen to hear from anyone who was born on 5th July 1948 and shares the same birthday as the NHS.

People can share their memories and photos by emailing the Communications Team at NHS70.wccg@nhs.net or by post to Communications, Wiltshire CCG, Southgate House, Pans Lane, Devizes, Wiltshire, SN10 5EQ. If you are sending any original photographs and would like them returned, please include your name and contact address.

Founded on the principle of free, high quality health care for all the NHS has evolved to meet our changing needs through new treatments, pioneering surgeries and technical innovations – helping us to live longer and better lives. None of this would be possible without the skill, dedication and compassion of NHS staff, as well as the many volunteers, charities and communities that support us and work tirelessly to provide care and support for everyone.

Do get in touch if you:
You share the same birthday as the NHS – were you one of the first babies to be born on 5 July 1948 in the NHS? You have recollections of working for the local NHS in Wiltshire (past and present) during the last 70 years You have received treatment or care from the NHS in Wiltshire and would like to share your story You can share any memories of our hospitals in Wiltshire, particularly if you have any old photographs of our hospitals (past and present) or the staff who worked in them We are especially interested in any memories and photographs from 1948, the year the NHS was founded and to hear from those who were born in 1948

Annual General Meeting

We are holding our annual general meeting in the conference room at Southgate House, Pans Lane, Devizes on Tuesday 26 June starting at 9.30am.

This event provides you with the opportunity to learn about what the clinical commissioning group has achieved in the past year and allows you to ask questions and find out more about our plans for the future – You can also pick up a copy of our annual report and accounts on the day.

Doors will be open from 9am for registration, and the AGM will take place between 9.30 – 10.30am.

If you would like to attend the AGM, please email tracy.torr@nhs.net by Friday 15 June 2018.


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Focus on End of Life Care

End of life care

Being told that you or someone you love and care for has a life limiting illness is tough news to receive. The care an individual needs at this time will be focused upon supporting them to have the best possible quality of life, independence and control over their life and care.

We believe that care at the end of a person’s life is vitally important and know that there is only one chance to get it right. Our end of life strategy sets out our local vision, which is for all patients at the end of life, together with those closest to them, are able to express their needs and wishes, and that as far as clinically appropriate, these needs and wishes are met.

What is end of life care?

Palliative and end of life care is about treatment and care focusing on the need of the whole person as well as their family, carers and friends. It is not just about managing pain and other symptoms but includes support to deal with emotional needs, social and spiritual needs, care in bereavement and help dealing with the financial effects of facing and of life situation.

End of life care includes palliative care, but can start earlier. If you have a terminal illness, or are approaching the end of your life, it may be a good idea to make plans in advance for the future of your care. Planning ahead in this way is sometimes called advance care planning. It involves thinking and talking about your wishes for how you are cared for in the final months of your life.

People usually carry out advance care planning because they have condition that is expected to get worse, which may mean they will not be able to make decisions, or communicated their decisions in the future. However, anyone can plan for their future care, whether they are approaching the end of their life or not. Advance care planning can help you let people know your wishes and feelings while you still can. Your wishes and preferences can then be shared with your family, carers, GP and others as appropriate.

Palliative care helps to make you as comfortable as possible by relieving pain and other distressing symptoms while providing psychological, social and spiritual support for you and your family or carers. This is called holistic approach to care, as it deals with the ‘whole’ person rather than just one aspect of their care.

Talking about death doesn’t bring death closer. It’s about planning for life. Without communication and understanding, death and terminal illness can be a lonely and stressful experience, both for the person who is dying and for their friends and family. There may be practical matters as well as care issues. Though hard to start these conversations, most people find it a great relief once it’s brought up.

Further information

Your GP is a good place to start if you want to discuss end of life, but you can also find lots of helpful information online:

Macmillan Cancer Support – advice and support for end of life
Dying matters – general information about preparing for a good death for the public and professionals
Terminal illness support from Marie Curie – at some stages all of us have to face the fact that we (or our loved ones) have a life limiting condition and are coming towards the end of our lives
Prospect Hospice – our local hospice
NHS Choices – general information about end of life care
What to expect when someone important to you is dying – a guide for carers, families and friends of dying people
Palliative and end of life care – a factsheet from Marie Curie

 

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Campaign 

One You: Nutrition

Eating out has become very common place and a quarter of our calories intake comes from eating out, meaning many of us are consuming more calories than we realise – an average of 200 to 300 extra calories per day. Over time, these extra calories can creep up on us and cause an unhealthy weight gain.

Public Health England’s One You campaign aims to help you be more aware of the calories you consume on the go and is encouraging people to make healthier choices, whether you are picking up breakfast on the way to work, having lunch at your desk or buying everyday meals.

This calorie creep is contributing to our county’s obesity problem which causes a range of health issues, including heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and some cancers.

One simple tip can help you make healthier choices while out and about – aim for 400-600-600. Try and stick to around 400 calories for breakfast, 600 calories for lunch and 600 calories for dinner, plus a couple of healthier snacks and drinks in-between.

So if you are looking to eat a little healthier, try a healthier choice today and aim for 400-600-600, because there is only One You: Nutrition.

Beware, ticks are lurking!

With the arrival of Spring, the CCG is advising you to brush up on your knowledge of ticks, what they are, where they live, the diseases they can carry, and how to minimise your risk of infection.

Ticks are small, spider like creatures that feed on the blood of animals, including people. They can be found in woodlands, grasslands, moorland, heathland and some urban parks and gardens.

Ticks are present in most parts of the country and are about the size of a poppy seed, and whilst irritating, most tick bites are harmless however; some ticks are infected with bacteria which can cause Lyme disease.

Symptoms of Lyme disease can include:

A high temperature (fever), headaches, tiredness (fatigue), muscle and joint pain, chills and neck stiffness and a characteristic skin rash that looks like a bulls-eye.

To minimise your risk of being bitten, take these steps to help protect yourself:
  • Keep to paths and away from long grass or overgrown vegetation if possible, as ticks crawl up long grass in their search for a feed
  • Wear appropriate clothing in tick infested areas (long sleeved shirt and long trousers tucked into socks).  Light coloured fabrics are useful, as it is easier to see ticks against a light background
  • Consider using insect repellents, e.g. DEET
  • Inspect skin frequently and remove any attached ticks
  • At the end of the day, check again thoroughly for ticks, especially in skin folds
  • Make sure that children’s head and neck areas, including scalps, are properly checked 
  • Check that ticks are not brought home on clothes
  • Check that pets do not bring ticks into the home on their fur

If you have been bitten by a diseased tick, symptoms of Lyme disease usually appear between 3 and 30 days. You should make a GP appointment as soon as possible and remember to tell them you were bitten by a tick. More information on tick bites can be found on our website.

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Follow us

You can find Wiltshire CCG on social media – follow us and keep up to date with our latest news.

www.facebook.com/NHSWiltshireCCG www.twitter.com/NHSWiltshireCCG www.pinterest.com/NHSWiltshireCCG
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Wiltshire residents urged to reduce their risk of Type 2 diabetes

The Healthier You: NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme (NDPP) is launching a Diabetes Prevention week campaign from 16 – 22 April 2018, and Wiltshire residents are being urged to eat healthily and be more active in order to help reduce their risk of type 2 diabetes. 

The campaign is also aiming to raise the awareness of the causes of Type 2 diabetes and the complications associated with it.

Diabetes is a long-term condition that affects the body’s ability to process sugar or glucose.  Early symptoms of diabetes include feeling very thirsty, feeling very tired and experiencing blurred vision. 

Diabetes can have serious health consequences; however, with careful management, people with diabetes can continue to lead full, healthy and active lives.

Type 2 diabetes is linked to lifestyle and it is estimated that over five million people in England are at high risk of developing the condition which in many cases can be prevented, so now more than ever is the time to support people to reduce their risk of developing the condition, as the need for prevention has never been greater.

Dr Andrew Girdher, GP at Box Surgery said,
“The Diabetes Prevention Programme offers a proven approach to support people who have been identified as being at risk to maintain a healthy weight and be more active; two factors which can significantly reduce the risk of developing the condition.

Participants learn how to eat healthily, add physical activity to their routine, manage stress, stay motivated and solve problems that can get in the way of healthy changes.”

If you have been told you are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, are registered at a GP practice in Wiltshire and haven’t already been referred to the programme, you can ask your GP or nurse to refer you.

If you haven’t been told you are at risk, you could go to www.riskscore.diabetes.co.uk to get an estimate of your risk of developing type 2 diabetes and if you are, ask your GP or practice nurse for a blood test to check your blood sugar levels. 

You can find out more about the Diabetes Prevention Programme at www.england.nhs.uk/ndpp

Help us celebrate 70 years of the NHS

This year marks the 70th anniversary of the National Health Service (NHS) as it celebrates its birthday on July 5 2018.  In the seven decades since it was founded in 1948 hundreds of millions of people have benefited from its services.

Wiltshire CCG wants to mark the occasion by sharing local people’s memories and reminiscences of the NHS – either because they have worked for the service, or have received NHS treatment over the last 70 years.  In particular, the CCG is keen to hear from anyone who was born on 5th July 1948 and shares the same birthday as the NHS.

Dr Richard Sandford-Hill, Chair of Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group said,
“We’re welcoming stories and photographs from patients, staff, volunteers – anyone who has a memory to share and a story to tell”. 

People can share their memories and photos by emailing the Communications Team on NHS70.wccg@nhs.net or by post to Communications, Wiltshire CCG, Southgate House, Pans Lane, Devizes, Wiltshire, SN10 5EQ.  If you are sending any original photographs and would like them returned, please include your name and contact address.

Founded on the principle of free high quality health care for all, the NHS has evolved to meet our changing needs through new treatments, pioneering surgeries and technical innovations – helping us live longer and better lives.

None of this would be possible without the skill, dedication and compassion of NHS staff, as well as the many volunteers, charities and communities that support us and work tirelessly to provide care and support for everyone.

Please get in touch if:

  • You share the same birthday as the NHS – were you one of the first babies to be born on 5 July 1948 in the NHS?
  • You have recollections of working for the local NHS in Wiltshire (past and present) during the last 70 years
  • You have received treatment or care from the NHS in Wiltshire and would like to share your story
  • You can share any memories of our hospitals in Wiltshire, particularly if you have any old photographs of our hospitals (past and present) or the staff who worked in them
  • We are especially interested in any memories and photographs from 1948, the year the NHS was founded – and to hear from those who were born in 1948.

Don’t let ticks ruin your outside fun this Spring!

With the arrival of Spring Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group is advising people to brush up on their knowledge of ticks, tiny spider-like creatures found in woodland and long grass, to minimise their risk of infection, especially during outdoor activities, like camping or hiking.

Ticks are present in most parts of the country and can be found in forests, woodland, heaths, moorland areas and urban parks.  Whilst irritating, most tick bites are harmless however, some ticks are infected with bacteria which can cause Lyme disease.

Dr Lindsay Kinlin, said
“Ticks that can transmit Lyme disease are very small – about the size of a poppy seed – and can easily be overlooked, so it is important to check regularly for attached ticks on the skin. 

Ticks prefer warm, moist places on your body, especially the groin area, waist, arm pits, behind the knee and along the hair line, so look out for anything as tiny as a freckle or a speck of dirt.”

Most ticks do not carry the infection, but if one is found it should be removed promptly.  Infected ticks are unlikely to transmit Lyme disease if they are removed in the early stages of attachment, generally the tick must be attached to an individual for 36 to 48 hours or more before it can spread the disease.  They can be removed with tweezers or special tick hooks, by pulling them gently upwards away from the skin.

To minimise the risk of being bitten, take these steps to protect yourself:

  • Keep to paths and away from long grass or overgrown vegetation if possible, as ticks crawl up long grass in their search for a feed
  • Wear appropriate clothing in tick infested areas (long sleeved shirt and long trousers tucked into socks). Light coloured fabrics are useful, as it is easier to see ticks against a light background
  • Consider using insect repellents, e.g. DEET
  • Inspect skin frequently and remove any attached ticks
  • At the end of the day, check again thoroughly for ticks, especially in skin folds
  • Make sure that children’s head and neck areas, including scalps, are properly checked
  • Check that ticks are not brought home on clothes
  • Check that pets do not bring ticks into the home on their fur

If you have been bitten by a diseased tick, symptoms of Lyme disease usually appear between 3 and 30 days and are similar to those of influenza.  If you are having flu-like symptoms, head-aches, muscle pain or joint pain, accompanied by a bulls-eye rash pattern on your skin you should make a GP appointment as soon as possible and remember to tell them you were bitten by a tick.

Major step forward to development of Devizes Health Centre

We are thrilled to announce that the GP-led Health Centre for Devizes can move to its next phase, after a commitment of £7million to funding.

The project, which we have led, aims to deliver significant benefits to patient care by creating a modern and sustainable facility for the people of Devizes and the surrounding area.

NHS Property Services (NHSPS), which owns the site of the proposed new development at Marshall Road, has this week confirmed it can commit to funding the construction phase of the project subject to conditions including the approval of the business cases by  NHS England and ourselves at Wiltshire CCG.

The commitment from NHSPS to fund the construction costs comes as outline planning permission for the development from Wiltshire Council is expected later this month.  However, the funding commitment marks a considerable move in respect to the scheme’s delivery.  We have held ongoing discussions regarding the proposal with NHS England and NHS Property Services to secure a solution to the complex ownership, planning, leasing and funding arrangements for the last three years.    

Dr Richard Sandford-Hill, Chairman of Wiltshire CCG and lead GP for the project said: 

“It’s really exciting to see that the Devizes Health Centre project is taking a significant step forward, and I’m delighted on behalf of the five Devizes GP practices and the CCG.  The commitment from NHS Property Services means it’s all systems “go” to work towards the implementation of this important, long awaited scheme that will provide modern, fit for purpose premises for the delivery of healthcare for the people of the Devizes community area.  There’s still a lot of work to do, and we look forward to the outcome of the Outline Planning Application, but we’re extremely confident now that we’re well on the way to achieving what we set out to do on behalf of our patients”.

The next step in the project will involve us concluding the outline business case, including a commitment to fund the future costs of running the health centre. 

If the outline business case is approved, work on developing the detailed design of the scheme can begin to inform the full business case, which would  then need to be approved by us and by NHS England.

Andrew Strange, Senior Strategy Manager at NHS Property Services, said:

“This is an important stage of the project.  There is still a long way to go and we will continue to work closely with the CCG and future occupiers to develop the scheme”.

The health centre development is part of a wider scheme that involves the release of land at Marshall Road for housing, and, in due course, the outdated community hospital in the town.

Annual General Meeting

Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group will be holding its Annual General Meeting (AGM) in the Conference Room at Southgate House, Pans Lane, Devizes on Tuesday 26 June starting at 9.30am.

Our AGM offers members of the public, patients and staff the opportunity to learn about what the Clinical Commissioning Group  has achieved in the past year and allows people to come along and ask questions and find out more about our plans for the future.

Copies of the annual report and accounts will also be available on the day.

Doors will be open for registration at 9.00am and the AGM will take place between 9.30am – 10.30am.  Refreshments will be available from registration.

If you would like to attend the AGM, please email tracy.torr@nhs.net by 15 June 2018.

Accessing healthcare in Wiltshire over the Easter bank holidays

With some health services closing for a few days over the Easter bank holidays, it’s vital that people who need help from NHS services get the advice they need from the right person, in the right place, at the right time.

Ask your pharmacist
Pharmacists are experts in many areas of healthcare and can offer advice on a wide range of long term conditions and common illnesses such as coughs, colds and stomach upsets. You don’t need an appointment to see a pharmacist and many have private consultation areas, so they are a good first port of call if you’re feeling unwell. Your pharmacist will tell you if you need further medical attention.
Call 111
If your GP surgery is closed and you’re not sure where to go then you should make a free phone call to NHS 111, which is available 24/7. An adviser will ask you questions to assess your symptoms and then give you the advice you need, or direct you to the best service for you in your area.
A&E and 999 are for life threatening emergencies
A&E departments and the ambulance service are for life threatening emergencies such as loss of consciousness, suspected heart attacks, breathing difficulties or severe bleeding that cannot be stopped. A&E is likely to be extremely busy over the holidays with long waiting times, so please call NHS 111 for advice first if you are not sure where to go.

Your local services

Opening times for your local GP and pharmacy services are available below. Please note that these times are subject to change.

Bradford on Avon >

 GP surgeries
 Practice  29/03/2018  30/03/2018 31/03/2018  01/04/2018  02/04/2018  03/04/2018 
 Bradford-on-Avon and Melksham
 Health Partnership
08:00 – 18:00
Telephone cover
18:00-18:30
Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:00
Telephone cover
18:00-18:30
 Pharmacies
   30/03/2018 31/03/2018  01/04/2018  02/04/2018  03/04/2018 
 Day Lewis Pharmacy (Silver Street) Closed 09:00 – 11.30 Closed Closed 09:00 – 13:00, 14:00 – 17:30
 Day Lewis Pharmacy
 (St Margarets Station Approach)
Closed 09:00 – 12:00 Closed Closed 09:00 – 13:00, 14:00 – 18:30

Calne >

 GP surgeries
 Practice  29/03/2018  30/03/2018 31/03/2018  01/04/2018  02/04/2018  03/04/2018 
 Northlands Surgery 08:00 – 18:30 Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30
 Patford House Surgery 08:00 – 18:30 Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30
 Beversbrook Medical Centre 08:00 – 18:30 Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30
 Pharmacies
   30/03/2018 31/03/2018  01/04/2018  02/04/2018  03/04/2018 
 Boots 09:00 – 13:00,
14:00 – 18:00
09:30 – 15:30 Closed Closed 09:30 – 13:00,
14:00 – 17:30
 Lloyds Closed 09:00 – 12:30 Closed Closed 09:30 – 13:00,
14:00 – 17:30
 Well Pharmacy Closed Closed Closed Closed 09:00 – 17:00
 Northlands Surgery Closed 07.00 – 21.30 Closed Closed 07.00 – 21.30

Chippenham >

 GP surgeries
 Practice  29/03/2018  30/03/2018 31/03/2018  01/04/2018  02/04/2018  03/04/2018 
 Hathaway Surgery 08:00 – 18:30 Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30
 Rowden  Surgery 08:00 – 18:30  Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30 
 Jubilee Field Surgery 08:00 – 14:00
cover from Sutton
Benger 14:00 – 18:30 
Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30 
(Telephone cover
13:00 – 14:00)
 Lodge Surgery 08:00 – 18:30 Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30
 Pharmacies
   30/03/2018 31/03/2018  01/04/2018  02/04/2018  03/04/2018 
 Boots 08:30 – 13:00,
14:00 – 17:30
09:30 – 15:30 Closed 10:00 – 16:00 09:30 – 13:00,
14:00 – 17:30
 Lloyds (Hathaway Medical Centre) 10:00 – 16:00 08:00 – 22:30 09:00 – 22:00 10:00 – 16:00 08:00 – 22:30
 Morrisons 10:00 – 16:00 09:00 – 17:00 Closed 10:00 – 16:00 09:00 – 17:00
 Lloyds (Bath Road) 08:00 – 14:00,
14:30 – 20:00
09:00 – 12:00,
14:30 – 17:30
Closed 09:00 – 14:00,
14:30 – 19:00
09:00 – 12:00,
14:30 – 17:30
 Lloyds (St Luke’s Drive) Closed 08:30 – 13:00 Closed Closed 08:30 – 18:00
 Well Pharmacy Closed Closed Closed Closed 09:00 – 18:00

Corsham >

 GP surgeries
 Practice  29/03/2018  30/03/2018 31/03/2018  01/04/2018  02/04/2018  03/04/2018 
 Porch Surgery 08:00 – 18:30 
(Telephone cover
12:30-13:30 )
Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30 
(Telephone cover
12:30-13:30 )
 Box Surgery 08:00 – 18:30 
(Telephone cover
13:00-14:00 )
 Out of hours  Out of hours  Out of hours  Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30 
(Telephone cover
13:00-14:00 )
 Pharmacies
   30/03/2018 31/03/2018  01/04/2018  02/04/2018  03/04/2018 
 Shaunaks Closed Closed 13:00 – 15:00 Closed 09:00 – 12:30,
13:30 – 18:00
 Boots 08:30 – 17:30 09:30 – 15:30 Closed Closed 09:30 – 13:30,
14:30 – 17:30
 Box Pharmacy Closed 09:00 – 13:00 Closed Closed 09:00 – 13:00,
14:15 – 18:15

Devizes >

 GP surgeries
 Practice  29/03/2018  30/03/2018 31/03/2018  01/04/2018  02/04/2018  03/04/2018 
 Lansdowne Surgery 08:00 – 18:30 Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30
 Southbroom Surgery 08:00 – 18:30 Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30
 St James’ Surgery 08:00 – 18:30 Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30
 Market Lavington Surgery 08:00 – 18:30  Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30
 Courtyard Surgery 08:00 – 18:30
(Telephone cover
12:30 – 13:30)
Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30 
(Telephone cover
12:30 – 13:30)
 Pharmacies
   30/03/2018 31/03/2018  01/04/2018  02/04/2018  03/04/2018 
 Day Lewis (Market Lavington) Closed 09:00 – 12:00 Closed Closed 09:00 – 13:00,
14:00 – 18:00
 Morrisons 10:00 – 16:00 09:00 – 13:00,
14:00 – 17:00
Closed 10:00 – 16:00 09:00 – 13:00,
14:00 – 17:00
 Boots 08:30 – 13:30,
14:30 – 17:30
09:30 – 15:30 Closed 10:00 – 16:00 09:30 – 12:00,
13:00 – 17:30
 Rowlands Pharmacy Closed 09:00 – 11:30 Closed Closed 09:00 – 13:00,
14:00 – 17:30

Malmesbury >

 GP surgeries
 Practice  29/03/2018  30/03/2018 31/03/2018  01/04/2018  02/04/2018  03/04/2018 
 Malmesbury Surgery 08:00 – 18:30 Out of hours Booked Patient
Appointments
08:00 – 11:30
Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30
 Tolsey Surgery 08:00 – 18:30 Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30
 Pharmacies
   30/03/2018 31/03/2018  01/04/2018  02/04/2018  03/04/2018 
 Boots (High Street) 09:00 – 17:30 09:30 – 15:30 Closed Closed 09:30 – 13:00,
14:00 – 17:30
 Boots (Priory Way) 08:00 – 16:00 06:30 – 20:30 Closed Closed 06:30 – 22:30
 Lloyds Closed 09:00 – 11:00,
14:00 – 17:00
Closed Closed 09:00 – 14:00,
16:30 – 18:30

Marlborough and Pewsey >

 GP surgeries
 Practice  29/03/2018  30/03/2018 31/03/2018  01/04/2018  02/04/2018  03/04/2018 
 Kennett & Avon Medical Partnership 08:00 – 18:30 Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30
 Ramsbury Surgery 08:00 – 18:30 Out of hours Booked Patient
Appointments
08:15 – 11:30
Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30
 Old School House Surgery 08:00 – 12:00
Cover from Burbage
practice 12:00 – 18:30
Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30
 Burbage Surgery 08:00 – 18:30
(Telephone cover
13:00 – 14:00)
Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30
(Telephone cover
13:00 – 14:00)
 Pharmacies
   30/03/2018 31/03/2018  01/04/2018  02/04/2018  03/04/2018 
 Boots (Marlborough) 08:45 – 17:30 09:30 – 15:30 Closed 09:00 – 17:30 09:30 – 13:30,
13:30 – 17:30 
 Kennet Pharmacy Closed Closed Closed Closed 09:00 – 17:00
 Boots (Pewsey) 09:00 – 18:00 09:00 – 11:00 Closed Closed 09:00 – 13:00,
14:00 – 17:30

Melksham >

 GP surgeries
 Practice  29/03/2018  30/03/2018 31/03/2018  01/04/2018  02/04/2018  03/04/2018 
 Giffords Surgery     08:00 – 18:30 Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30
 Spa Surgery     08:00 – 18:30 Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30
 Pharmacies
   30/03/2018 31/03/2018  01/04/2018  02/04/2018  03/04/2018 
 Gompels (Spa Medical Centre) Closed Closed Closed Closed 09:00 – 13:00,
14:00 – 18:00
 Gompels (Bank Street) Closed 09:00 – 13:00 Closed Closed 09:00 – 13:00,
14:00 – 17:30
 Boots Closed 09:30 – 13:00,
14:00 – 17:30
Closed Closed 09:30 – 13:00,
14:00 – 17:30
 Lloyds (Bath Road) 10:00 – 16:00 07:00 – 22:00 Closed 10:00 – 16:00 07:00 – 23:00
 Asda 09:00 – 18:00 07:00 – 22:00 Closed 09:00 – 18:00 07:00 – 23:00
 Lloyds (Spa Road) Closed 09:30 – 12:00 Closed Closed 08:30 – 12:00,
14:30 – 18:30

Royal Wootton Bassett >

 GP surgeries
 Practice  29/03/2018  30/03/2018 31/03/2018  01/04/2018  02/04/2018  03/04/2018 
 Tinkers Lane Surgery 08:00 – 18:30 Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30
 New Court Surgery 08:00 – 18:30 Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30
 Pharmacies
   30/03/2018 31/03/2018  01/04/2018  02/04/2018  03/04/2018 
 Boots 09:00 – 13:00,
14:00 – 17:30
09:30 – 13:00,
14:00 – 17:30
Closed Closed 09:30 – 13:00,
14:00 – 17:30
 Cohens (Boroughfields)  Closed 09:00 – 12:00,
14:30 – 17:30
Closed Closed 09:00 – 12:00,
14:30 – 18:30
 Cohens (High Street)  Closed 08:45 – 13:00 Closed Closed 09:00 – 13:00,
14:00 – 18:00

Salisbury >

 GP surgeries
 Practice  29/03/2018  30/03/2018 31/03/2018  01/04/2018  02/04/2018  03/04/2018 
 Orchard Partnership 08:00 – 18:30 Out of hours Booked Patient
Appointments
09:00 -12:00
Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30
 Six Penny Handley  08:00 – 18:30   Out of hours  Out of hours    Out of hours   Out of hours  08:00 – 18:30
 Salisbury Medical Practice 08:00 – 18:30   Out of hours   Out of hours   Out of hours   Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30
 Avon Valley Practice  08:00 – 18:30  Out of hours Out of hours   Out of hours Out of hours  08:00 – 18:30 
 Three Chequers Medical Practice 08:00 – 18:30 Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30
 Harcourt Medical Centre 08:00 – 18:30  Out of hours  Out of hours  Out of hours  Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30
 Whiteparish Surgery 08:00 – 18:30
(Telephone cover
13:00 – 14:00)
 Out of hours Booked Patient
Appointments
08:00 – 12:00
 Out of hours  Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30
(Telephone cover
13:00 – 14:00)
 Barcroft Medical Centre 08:00 – 18:30   Out of hours  Out of hours  Out of hours  Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30
 Castle Surgery 08:00 – 18:30   Out of hours  Out of hours  Out of hours  Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30 
 Downton Surgery  08:00 – 18:30  Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30 
 St Melor House Surgery  08:00 – 18:30  Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30 
 Tisbury Surgery   08:00 – 18:30  Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours  08:00 – 18:30 
 Silton Surgery  08:00 – 16:00
Telephone cover
16:00 – 18:30
Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours  08:00 – 16:00
Telephone cover
16:00 – 18:30
 Hindon Surgery  08:00 – 18:30  Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30 
 Cross Plain Surgery   08:00 – 18:30
(Telephone cover
13:00 – 14:00)
Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30
(Telephone cover
13:00 – 14:00)
 Mill Stream Medical Centre  08:00 – 18:30  Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30 
 Pharmacies
   30/03/2018 31/03/2018  01/04/2018  02/04/2018  03/04/2018 
 Boots (Amesbury – Salisbury Street) 09:00 – 14:00 09:00 – 11:00 Closed Closed 09:00 – 12:30,
13:30 – 17:30
 Boots (Amesbury – Stonehenge Walk) Closed Closed Closed Closed 09:00 – 13:30,
14:30 – 18:30
 Rowlands Pharmacy (Pembroke Road) Closed 09:00 – 11:30 Closed Closed 09:00 – 13:00,
14:00 – 17:30
 Bishopsdown Pharmacy  Closed Closed   Closed  Closed  09:00 – 13:00,
14:00 – 18:00
 Downton Pharmacy Closed 09:00 – 11:30 Closed Closed 09:00 – 13:00,
14:00 – 17:30
 Lloyds (Amesbury – Bulford Road) Closed Closed Closed Closed 14:00 – 17:30
 PW and JA Hedge (Central Street) Closed 09:00 – 13:00 Closed Closed 09:00 – 13:00,
14:00 – 18:00
 Tesco (Bourne Centre) 08:00 – 22:00 08:00 – 20:00 Closed 09:00 – 18:00 08:00 – 20:00
 Rowlands Pharmacy (Cranebridge Road) Closed Closed 15:00 – 17:00 Closed 09:00 – 13:00,
14:00 – 18:00
 Superdrug (George Mall) 08:30 – 13:30,
14:00 – 17:30
09:00 – 13:30,
14:30 – 17:30
Closed Closed 09:00 – 13:30,
14:30 – 17:30
 Three Swans Pharmacy Closed Closed 11:00 – 13:00 Closed 09:00 – 13:00,
14:00 – 18:00
 Boots (Silver Street) 08:30 – 17:30 09:30 – 14:00,
15:00 – 17:30
Closed 10:00 – 16:00 09:30 – 14:00,
15:00 – 17:30
 Rowlands Millstream Medical Centre
 (Avon Approach)
Closed 09:00 – 11:30 Closed Closed 09:00 – 17:30
 Tanday Pharmacy Closed Closed Closed Closed 09:00 – 14:00,
15:00 – 18:00
 Rowlands (St Ann Street) Closed Closed Closed Closed 09:00 – 13:00,
14:00 – 18:00
 Boots (Tisbury – High Street) 10:00 – 16:00  09:00 – 13:00 Closed Closed 09:00 – 12:00,
14:00 – 18:00
 PW and JA Hedge (Dummer Lane) 10:00 – 13:00  09:00 – 18:00 10:30 – 13:00 10:00 – 13:00 09:00 – 13:00,
14:00 – 18:00
 Lloyds (Wilton – North Street) Closed 09:00 – 11:00,
14:00 – 17:00
Closed Closed 09:00 – 12:00,
14:00 – 18:00

Swindon >

 GP surgeries
 Practice  29/03/2018  30/03/2018 31/03/2018  01/04/2018  02/04/2018  03/04/2018 
 Purton Surgery           08:00 – 18:30  Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30 
 Cricklade Surgery           08:00 – 18:30  Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30 
 Pharmacies
   30/03/2018 31/03/2018  01/04/2018  02/04/2018  03/04/2018 
 Boots (Cricklade – High Street) Closed 09:00 – 11:30 Closed Closed 09:00 – 13:00,
14:00 – 17:30
 Lloyds (Purton) Closed 09:30 – 12:00 Closed Closed 09:00 – 12:30,
15:00 – 18:30
 Lyneham Pharmacy Closed 09:00 – 13:30 Closed Closed 09:00 – 18:30

Trowbridge

 GP surgeries
 Practice  29/03/2018  30/03/2018 31/03/2018  01/04/2018  02/04/2018  03/04/2018 
 Trowbridge Health Centre      08:00 – 18:30   Out of hours  Out of hours  Out of hours  Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30 
 Lovemead Surgery      08:00 – 18:30  Out of hours Out of hours  Out of hours  Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30 
 Pharmacies
   30/03/2018 31/03/2018  01/04/2018  02/04/2018  03/04/2018 
 Boots (Polebarn Circus) Closed 09:00 – 12:00 Closed Closed 09:00 – 13:00,
14:00 – 18:00
 Boots Trowbridge Health Centre
 (Seymour Road)
Closed 09:00 – 11:00 15:00 – 17:00 Closed 09:00 – 13:00,
14:00 – 18:00
 Boots (Bythesea Road) 08:00 – 19:00 08:00 – 00:00 Closed 08:00 – 19:00 08:00 – 00:00
 Tesco 06:30 – 22:30 06:30 – 22:00 Closed 09:00 – 18:00 08:00 – 22:30
 Gorgemead (Bradford Road) Closed Closed Closed Closed 09:00 – 13:00,
14:00 – 18:00
 Gorgemead (Wingfield Road) Closed Closed Closed Closed 09:00 – 13:00,
14:00 – 18:00
 Lloyds Closed 09:00 – 13:00 Closed Closed 09:00 – 13:00,
14:00 – 18:00
 Superdrug 08:30 – 13:00,
13:00 – 17:30
09:30 – 13:15,
13:45 – 17:30
Closed Closed 10:00 – 13:15,
13:45 – 17:00

Warminster >

 GP surgeries
 Practice  29/03/2018  30/03/2018 31/03/2018  01/04/2018  02/04/2018  03/04/2018 
 Avenue Surgery            08:00 – 18:30  Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30 
 Mere Surgery           08:00 – 17:00
Medvivo
17:00 – 18:30
Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 17:00
Medvivo
17:00 – 18:30
 Pharmacies
   30/03/2018 31/03/2018  01/04/2018  02/04/2018  03/04/2018 
 Boots (The Avenue) Closed Closed Closed Closed 09:00 – 13:00,
14:00 – 18:00
 Boots (Market Place) 08:30 – 12:30,
13:30 – 17:30
08:30 – 13:00,
14:00 – 17:30
Closed 10:00 – 16:00 09:30 – 13:00,
14:00 – 17:30
 Well Pharmacy Closed 09:00 – 14:00 Closed Closed 08:45 – 15:45
 Mere Pharmacy Closed 09:00 – 13:00 Closed Closed 09:30 – 13:00,
14:00 – 17:30

Westbury >

 GP surgeries
 Practice  29/03/2018  30/03/2018 31/03/2018  01/04/2018  02/04/2018  03/04/2018 
 White Horse Health Centre 08:00 – 18:30  Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours Out of hours 08:00 – 18:30 
 Pharmacies
   30/03/2018 31/03/2018  01/04/2018  02/04/2018  03/04/2018 
 John Preddy and Co Closed Closed Closed Closed 09:00 – 17:00
 Boots 10:00 – 16:00   09:00 – 17:30  Closed Closed 09:00 – 18:00
 Shaunaks Closed Closed 10:00 – 12:00 Closed 09:00 – 17:00

Know where to go to find the right healthcare this Easter

Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group is advising people to be prepared so they know where to go for healthcare advice and treatment over the Easter bank holiday; helping them to access the right service at the right time according to their needs.

Dr Richard Sandford-Hill, Chair of Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group said,
“Easter is a great time to get out and about with friends and family, particularly if the weather is good, and no-one wants illness or injury to affect their plans. We’re encouraging people to be well-prepared ahead of the bank holiday and know where to go to access the right healthcare that you might need. To help with this Wiltshire CCG has an easy to use ‘Around the clock healthcare leaflet’ available to download from our website

Bank holidays are extremely busy times for the NHS and we are asking people in Wiltshire to use our local services wisely this Easter so that our emergency services, such as 999, are available for those who need them most.

Healthcare services in Wiltshire

Pharmacists – are experts on medicines and how they work. They can also offer advice on common complaints such as coughs, colds, aches and pains and other health issues and help to decide whether it’s necessary to see a doctor. Find your nearest pharmacy here.

Minor Injuries Units – are for patients with less serious injuries, such as sprains, cuts and grazes. No appointments are required and they are led by qualified nurse practitioners. Find out MIU opening times in Chippenham and Trowbridge here.

Salisbury walk-in centre – open from 6.30pm until 10pm week days, and 8am until 8pm weekends including bank holidays. The centre is run by a team of experienced doctors and nurses and is based on a first come first served basis, unless someone is acutely unwell and needs immediate attention. For details on how to find the Salisbury walk-in centre visit: http://www.salisburywalkincentre.co.uk.

NHS 111 – available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and calls to 111 are free from landlines and mobiles. It is staffed by a team of fully trained advisers, supported by experienced clinicians. Healthcare advice can be given over the telephone, or you may be directed to a local service if appropriate.

For life threatening situations serious injuries, loss of consciousness, chest pain or suspected stroke you should always call 999.

Dr Sandford-Hill continues,
“We also strongly recommend that people check that they have enough of their routine medication to see them through the four day weekend. If you need to order more, it is advisable to request it well in advance of the bank holiday to ensure that you receive it in time.”

March 2018

Contents

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Welcome

Hello,

Welcome to March’s edition of ‘in touch’.

In this issue, we tell you about Carer Support Wiltshire’s new contact which starts on 1 April 2018 where they will provide support to carers of all ages in Wiltshire.  We are delighted to continue working with Carer Support Wiltshire; they play an invaluable role in supporting carers meaning that many of the people who they care for are able to remain in their own homes and out of hospital or care homes.

The Easter bank holiday break will be here soon and with this comes additional pressures on health services, especially A&E.  We are reminding people who are not seriously ill about the alternative health care services available over the bank holiday and to help you make the right decision about where to go download our ‘Around the clock healthcare leaflet’.

To help enable us to provide safe environments that reduce harm from exposure to second-hand smoke, all NHS sites in Wiltshire have pledged to become completely smoke free from 1 January 2019. We are already a smoke free NHS site here at Southgate House, but some NHS sites in Wiltshire still have designated areas for smoking.  This means in nine months’ time smoking will not be permitted on any NHS sites in Wiltshire including all buildings, grounds and vehicles.  It also means that designated smoking areas will be removed.  There is plenty of help available if you want to quit smoking on nhs.uk/smokefree.

Be sure to set your clocks forward this weekend and let’s start to enjoy the longer and warmer days to come!

Linda

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In the news!

Find the right health advice and treatment over the Easter bank holiday

The four day break over Easter can sometimes catch people off guard when it comes to planning for their healthcare needs.  With GP surgeries in Wiltshire closed on Friday 30 March and Monday 2 April, we are asking people to plan ahead and consider the range of healthcare services available if they need medical advice, or treatment over the bank holiday.

It’s important that people understand where to go for health advice so that people avoid going to A&E for less serious illnesses and injury and to help with this, we have produced an easy to use ‘Around the clock healthcare in Wiltshire leaflet’. 

By making the right choices, people get the help they need, when they need it and it also helps reduce the impact on the health system over what is an extremely busy period for A&E departments in Wiltshire.

For a minor health problem it may be possible to seek health and advice from your local pharmacy, many of which will be open over the bank holiday.  Pharmacists are experts on medicine and how they work.  They can also offer advice on common complaints such as coughs, colds, aches and pains and other health issues and help to decide whether it’s necessary for you to see a doctor.

We also strongly recommend that people think ahead and check that they have enough of their routine medication to see them through the four day weekend.  If you need to order more, it is advisable to request it well in advance of the bank holiday to ensure that you receive it in time.

NHS 111 is also available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and calls are free from landlines and mobiles.  It is staffed by a team of fully trained advisers, supported by experienced clinicians.  Healthcare advice can be given over the telephone or you may be directed to a local service if appropriate.

For life threatening situations, serious injuries, loss of consciousness, chest pain or suspected stroke you should always call 999.

The views of over 200 individuals from across Bath and North East Somerset, Swindon and Wiltshire have helped shape a modern service for children and young people with emotional wellbeing and mental health problems.

New contact for Carer Support Wiltshire to support carers of all ages

Carer Support Wiltshire starts their new contract to support carers of all ages on 1 April 2018.  The contact was awarded by Wiltshire Council, with funding support from NHS Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group and builds on the existing work the organisation been doing with both organisation for a number of years to support adult carers. 

 The new contract will involve the organisation providing services and support for all carers in Wiltshire, including young carers, parent carers, those juggling work with caring and an aging population living longer and looking after loved ones.

One of their focuses will be going out into the community to improve information and accessibility for all and this will be done by introducing Community Connectors, who will work across Wiltshire to raise awareness, and support and identify carers and they will be in the following areas:

  • Malmesbury, Royal Wootton Bassett and Calne
  • Chippenham, Corsham and Bradford-on-Avon
  • Devizes, Marlborough and Pewsey
  • Melksham, Trowbridge and Westbury
  • Tidworth, South Wilts and Salisbury
  • Warminster, Mere and South West Wiltshire

Their young carer service will also begin from 1 April 2018 to ensure that all young carers are identified and properly supported.  They will work with schools, colleges, community groups and delivery partners, such as Youth Action Wiltshire to provide young carers with breaks, activities and opportunities to learn, aspire and grow.

Carers play an invaluable role within our communities and this new contract will help strengthen the support that is provided to them and will also help raise awareness of what is available to help support carers in their caring role.  Find out more by visiting the Carer Support Wiltshire website.

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Focus on ‘Smoke Free NHS’

‘Stub it out’

That’s the message to smokers as all NHS sites in Wiltshire begin their nine month countdown to becoming completely smoke free.

In order to help reduce the number of people who smoke and the serious illnesses associated with smoking, the pledge is for all of NHS sites in Wiltshire to smoke free by Tuesday 1 January 2019. 

In nine months’ time staff, patients and visitors (including contractors and suppliers) will no longer be able to smoke anywhere on NHS sites, including grounds and gardens or in vehicles and car parks.

NHS buildings in Wiltshire have been smoke free for several years, but the introduction of this new policy means smoking and tobacco use will not be allowed anywhere on site.  Home of the Clinical Commissioning Group, Southgate House in Devizes is already a non-smoking site but some of our NHS sites in Wiltshire still have designated areas for smoking, which are used by staff, patients and visitors.  From Tuesday 1 January 2019, this will no longer be the case. 

By NHS sites going smoke free, it will mean a much safer and fresher environment for our patients, our visitors and our staff and will bring significant benefits for the health and wellbeing of everyone in our using NHS services.

We know, for example, that patients recover quicker from periods of illness or injury, have shorter lengths of stay in hospital, require less medication and generally have fewer complications, when they do not smoke.

Over the next nine months we will be engaging with our staff, patients and visitors to identify the most effective ways to support them, and the announcement is being made nine months ahead of implementation of a smoke free NHS in Wiltshire to provide time for those who do smoke to be prepared for the change, and to give them the opportunity to quit smoking.

If you would like support to quit smoking, please visit : www.nhs.uk/smokefree for expert advice and support or call the Smokefree National Helpline to speak to a trained adviser on 0300 123 1044.

We understand that some people may not wish to stop smoking during their stay in hospitals, or whilst at work and support will be provided to assist them in abstaining whilst they are on an NHS site through Nicotine Replacement Therapy and support from stop smoking advisors.

There are many benefits in not smoking both to the smoker, their family and loved ones and the wider community. 

Some of the benefits of not smoking can affect the body very quickly:
  • After 20 minutes blood pressure and heart rate can return to normal
  • After 8 hours nicotine and carbon monoxide levels in the blood half and oxygen levels return to normal
  • After 1 day lungs start to clear and carbon monoxide levels return to normal
  • After 2 days ability to smell and taste are improved
  • After 3 days breathing becomes easier and energy levels improve
  • After 3 – 9 months 
  • lung function improves by 10% and there is improvement with coughing, breathing and wheezing
  • After 5 years risk of stroke returns to that of a non-smoker
  • After 10 years risk of lung cancer returns to that of a non-smoker

There is no given right to smoke and no obligation to permit people to smoke.  It is part of our duty to improve and protect the health and wellbeing of our staff, patients and wider communities and this includes ensuring we uphold their right to be protected from second hand smoke.

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Have your say!

Make a difference: Join your Patient Participation Group

A patient participation group (PPG) is made up of volunteers from patients and carers of patients registered at a GP practice.  PPGs meet regularly and work in partnership with the practice staff and doctors to ensure the practice deliver high quality and responsive care. 

PPGs can also offer a way for patients and practice staff to talk to each other, to share experiences and ideas, and to work together to improve patient experience.

The main purpose of most PPGs is to represent patients’ views and work with the practice to make changes. Some PPGs also volunteer to carry out other activities such as health promotion events, acting as advocates to encourage other patients to take responsibility for their own health, setting up support groups, promoting practice services and sharing information.

If you want to join your patient participation group speak to the staff at your practice who will advise you on how to join and become an active member of their PPG.

 

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Campaign 

Your pharmacy can help!

Your pharmacy team can help you with minor health concerns. To find out where your nearest pharmacy is, visit our website.

Community pharmacists and pharmacy technicians are qualified healthcare professionals who can offer clinical advice and over the counter medicines to effectively and safely manage a range of minor health concerns, including:

 

 

  • Sore throats
  • Coughs
  • Colds
  • Tummy troubles
  • Teething

Every pharmacist is trained in managing minor illnesses and providing health and wellbeing advice, so they are the right person to see for minor health concerns.

With over 12,000 pharmacies open every day of the week in England, and many offering extended opening hours in the evenings and weekends, it is easy to find a pharmacy close to you.

Pharmacists are healthcare experts who can give you clinical advice, right there and then, and if your symptoms are more serious, they can ensure you get the help you need.
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Promoting Cancer 

In last month’s newsletter we gave a focus on cancer, and how one in three people in England will develop some form of cancer during their lifetime.  Recognising the signs and symptoms of cancer early could save your life and this month we are focusing on Prostate cancer and Cervical cancer.  If you do recognise any of the symptoms, tell your doctor.  If it’s detected early, it is more treatable.

Prostate cancer

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the UK, with over 40,000 new cases diagnosed every year.

Prostate cancer develops slowly, so there may be no signs you have it for many year.  Symptoms often only become apparent when your prostate is large enough to affect the urethra and when this happens, you may notice things like an increased need to urinate, straining while urinating and a feeling that your bladder has not fully emptied.

These symptoms shouldn’t be ignored, but they do not mean you definitely have prostate cancer.

For many men with prostate cancer, treatment is not immediately necessary.  If the cancer is at an early stage and not causing symptoms, a policy of “watchful waiting” or “active surveillance” may be adopted.  This involves carefully monitoring your condition.

Some cases of prostate cancer can be cured if treated in the early stages and treatment includes surgically removing the prostate, radiotherapy and hormone therapy.

Some cases are only diagnosed at a later stage when the cancer has spread.  If the cancer spreads to other parts of the body, typically the bones, it cannot be cured and treatment is focused on prolonging life and relieving symptoms.

As prostate cancer usually progresses very slowly, you can live for decades without symptoms or needing treatment.

Learn more about prostate cancer on NHS Choices.

Cervical cancer

Cervical cancer is a type of cancer that develops in a women’s cervix (the entrance to the womb) and has no symptoms in its early stages.  If you do have symptoms, the most common is unusual vaginal bleeding, which can occur after sex, in between periods or after the menopause.

Abnormal bleeding doesn’t mean that you definitely have cervical cancer, but it should be investigated by your GP as soon as possible.  If your GP thinks you might have cervical cancer, you should be referred to see a specialist within two weeks.

The NHS offers a cervical screening programme to all women from the age of 25.  During cervical screening, a small sample of cells is taken from the cervix and checked under a microscope for abnormalities.  You will receive a letter from your GP offering you a screening appointment and we urge to you attend.

An abnormal cervical screening test doesn’t mean you definitely have cancer.  Most abnormal results are caused by an infection or the presence of treatable precancerous cells, rather than cancer itself.

If cervical cancer is diagnosed at an early stage, it’s usually possible to treat it using surgery.  In some cases, it’s possible to leave the womb in place, but it may need to be removed.  The surgical procedure used to remove the womb is called a hysterectomy.  Radiotherapy is an alternative to surgery for some women with early stage cervical cancer and in some cases it’s used alongside surgery.

The stage at which cervical cancer is diagnosed is an important factor in determining a women’s outlook, and this is dependent on how far the cancer has spread.

The chances of living for at least five years after being diagnosed with cervical cancer are:

Stage 1: 80 – 99%
Stage 2: 60 – 90%
Stage 3: 30 – 50%
Stage 4: 20%

In the UK, just under 1,000 women die from cervical cancer every year.  You can find out more information on cervical  cancer on NHS Choices.

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Follow us

You can find Wiltshire CCG on social media – follow us and keep up to date with our latest news.

www.facebook.com/NHSWiltshireCCG www.twitter.com/NHSWiltshireCCG www.pinterest.com/NHSWiltshireCCG
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Stub it out’. That’s the message to smokers as all NHS sites across B&NES, Swindon and Wiltshire begin their nine month countdown to become completely smoke free

From Tuesday 1 January 2019 all NHS sites and services across Bath & North East Somerset, Swindon and Wiltshire will be smoke free.

In nine months’ time staff, patients and visitors (including contractors and suppliers) will no longer be able to smoke anywhere on NHS sites, including the grounds and gardens or in vehicles and car parks. Some NHS providers may become smoke free before Tuesday 1 January 2019.

The decision to become completely smoke free is in line with The Health Act (2006) and The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE 2013) guidelines which state that all hospital sites, including mental health hospitals, and sites where NHS services are provided, should be 100% smoke free.

Duncan Selbie, Chief Executive of Public Health England, has written to the Chief Executives of every NHS Trust in England calling for their personal commitment to becoming a smoke free NHS.

Across B&NES, Swindon and Wiltshire all NHS providers are committed to no tobacco use on site and providing support to staff and patients to either stop smoking or manage their nicotine dependency while at work or during their stay in hospital.

Dr Ian Orpen and Dr Christine Blanshard, co-chairs for the BSW STP Clinical Board, said:
“Currently many of our NHS sites and providers have designated areas for smoking, which are used by staff, patients and visitors. From Tuesday 1 January 2019, this will no longer be the case. “The buildings have been smoke free for several years, but the introduction of this new policy across B&NES, Swindon and Wiltshire, means smoking and tobacco use will not be allowed anywhere on site, even in car parks.

“We want to send out a clear message that smoking severely damages your health and can slow down your recovery time after an operation or procedure. We will be providing support for our staff and patients to help them become smoke free, should they wish to.

“We understand that some people may not wish to stop smoking and we will be providing them with assistance to ensure that during their stay in hospital or whilst at work they can abstain by using Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) and support from our stop smoking advisors. “E-cigarettes are currently the most popular method for quitting amongst smokers so we will be looking at how we can support smokers who wish to use these devices.”

The announcement is being made nine months ahead of the implementation of smoke free NHS sites to ensure widespread awareness and provide time for those who do smoke to prepare for the change.

Some of the measures that will be used to ensure staff, patients and visitors are aware of the policy change include:

  • New on-site signage
  • Messages in patient letters
  • Training for all frontline staff to help patients stop or abstain from smoking
  • Events to promote the new policy

For staff, patients and visitors who want to stop smoking before Tuesday 1 January 2019:

  • A range of information and support on how to stop smoking is available at nhs.uk/smokefree
  • Face to face advice on Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) and or E-cigarettes is available from your local pharmacy, your GP surgery and local stop smoking services.

Got an appointment, but can’t get there? Remember to cancel it.

If you have an appointment booked at your GP Practice and are unable to get there safely due to the snowfall, please remember to let your practice know.

Wiltshire Council and CCG praised for improving cervical screening attendance

We are among the 20% of local authorities praised by Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust, for comprehensive and targeted work to improve cervical screening attendance in Wiltshire. However, uptake of cervical screening is decreasing and currently at a 20 year low nationally – which leaves women at an increased risk of developing cancer.
Ben Anderson, portfolio holder for Public Health said: “We know that cervical screening saves lives. It’s very important women are encouraged to attend their screening appointments so that any changes can be detected and investigated at an early stage.  Being recognised like this gives us confidence that we’re doing things the right way. Prevention is always better than cure and we’re determined to do everything we can to ensure cervical screening attendance continues to rise in Wiltshire.”

Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust recently published a report which highlighted areas, including Wiltshire, that have implemented good practice to improve cervical screening uptake. It urges other CCGs, local authorities and GP practices across England to work together to plan activities and interventions to increase cervical screening coverage.

Dr Richard Sandford-Hill, Chair of Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group and GP at Market Lavington Surgery added: “It is really important to continue to encourage women in Wiltshire to attend regular survival screening.  This allows us to pick up pre-cancerous changes in the cervix before they develop into cancer, meaning these cells can then be treated.  Screening only takes a few minutes and can save many lives, so please do attend your screening appointment when invited.”

One in three women diagnosed with breast cancer each year are aged 70 or over

NHS Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group is supporting the national Be Clear on Cancer campaign and are urging women aged 70 or over to be aware of breast cancer symptoms.

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in England with around 44,600 women diagnosed every year. National figures show that around 9,500 women die from breast cancer each year and over half of these women are aged 70 and over (5,400). This equates to around 15 women aged 70 and over dying from breast cancer in England every day.

Dr Andy Hall, GP at Orchard Partnership said,
“Despite older women being at an increased risk of breast cancer, they are also more likely to delay in going to their GP with breast cancer symptoms. We are not just talking about a lump, if you notice any unusual or persistent changes to your breasts such as a change to a nipple, or to the skin or the shape of a breast, book an appointment with your doctor and have it investigated.”

It’s important for all women over 70 to not assume they are past it. Early diagnosis of breast cancer is crucial and means treatment is more likely to be successful.  If breast cancer is diagnosed at the earliest stage, it will increase their chances of survival.

Dr Hall continued,
“It’s important to carry on checking your breasts as you get older because the chance of being diagnosed with breast cancer increases with age. The earlier it’s caught the better, so know the symptoms, and don’t be afraid to visit your doctor if you are concerned about any potential signs.”

Possible signs of breast cancer include:

  • A lump or thickening in your breast or armpit
  • Change to the skin of your breast
  • Changes in the shape or size of your breast
  • Nipple changes
  • Nipple discharge
  • Pain in your breast or armpit
  • Any other unusual or persistent changes to your breasts

If you have any of these symptoms, your doctor will want to see you.

For more information on the signs and symptoms of breast cancer, please visit our campaign page

February 2018

Contents

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Welcome

Hello,

Welcome to February’s edition of ‘in touch’.

In this issue we’re excited to tell you about a new Children and Adolescent Mental Health service that starts on 1 April. Over 200 people across Wiltshire, Bath and North East Somerset and Swindon helped to shape the service which will support young people aged 0-18 years.

NHS England is working with NHS Clinical Commissioners on a public consultation to reduce prescribing of over the counter medicines for minor, short-term health concerns. Drugs like paracetamol can cost the NHS up to three times more on prescription than if patients bought them directly from a supermarket. The results from the consultation will inform national guidance on how such drugs are available in the future. What are your thoughts on buying some medication over the counter? Share your views by completing the survey.

Over the coming months we’ll be focusing on cancer types and the common signs to look out for. 

It’s very easy to ignore symptoms and put off going to see your doctor, but if you are worried you should book an appointment with your doctor straight away.

It may not be anything serious, but if it is cancer it’s important to find it early. See below for the campaigns we’re highlighting in this edition.

While Winter hasn’t quite left us yet the days are gradually getting longer and the sun is starting to brighten up our skies – Spring is nearly here!

Linda

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In the news!

New service to support children and young people with their emotional wellbeing

The views of over 200 individuals from across Bath and North East Somerset, Swindon and Wiltshire have helped shape a modern service for children and young people with emotional wellbeing and mental health problems.

The new Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) service starts on 1 April 2018 and will be delivered by Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust. The service be providing targeted and specialist mental health and wellbeing support to children and young people aged 0-18 years, which includes having timely access to an integrated system of co-ordinated and effective promotion, prevention, early intervention and community support and treatment.

Ted Wilson, Director of Community Services and Joint Commissioning for Wiltshire CCG said: “With valuable input from young people across Wiltshire, Bath and North East Somerset and Swindon we have commissioned a mental health service that will better suit their needs, be easier for them to access and will provide improved advice and support.”

National Survey shows improvements in women’s experiences of maternity care

Most women are having a positive experience of maternity care and treatment with the NHS, according to a survey of more than 18,000 people in England.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) survey results reveal responses from women who had given birth in February 2017 in services run by 130 NHS trusts across the country.

Women were asked questions about all aspects of their maternity care from the first time they saw a clinician or midwife, during labour and birth, through to the care provided at home in the weeks following the arrival of their baby. The results highlighted improvements in areas such as choice on where to give birth, quality of information and access to help and support after giving birth.

The full results for England as well as individual results for each trust are available on the CQC’s website.

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Focus on cancer!

More than one in three people in England will develop some form of cancer during their lifetime.

Cancer can start almost anywhere in the human body, which is made up of trillions of cells. Normally cells grow and divide to form new cells when the body needs them. When cancer develops, old or damaged cells survive when they should die, and new cells form when they are not needed. These extra cells can divide without stopping and may form growths called tumours. These cancerous cells can invade and destroy surrounding healthy tissue, including organs.

There are more than 200 different types of cancer, and each one is diagnosed and treated in a particular way. The four most common types of cancer diagnosed in England are:

Spotting the signs

It is important to be aware of any unexplained changes to your body. If you notice any changes to your body’s normal processes or unusual, unexplained symptoms – such as the sudden appearance of a lump, blood in your urine, or a change to your usual bowel habits, it’s important to see your doctor so they can investigate. The chances are it is nothing serious, but it might be something that needs attention and if diagnosed earlier, treatment can be a lot more successful.

Click here for more information on cancer and spotting the signs and symptoms.

We’re helping to raise awareness of cancer, so keep an eye out for information on the following campaigns in the next few issues of ‘in touch’:

Prostate Cancer Awareness Month
In the UK, about one in eight men will get prostate cancer at some point in their lives.

Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month
Ovarian cancer is the biggest gynaecological killer of UK women, as most women are diagnosed once the cancer has spread which makes treatment more challenging.

Be clear on cancer – breast cancer in women over 70 
In England, one in three women who get breast cancer are aged 70 or over.

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in England with around 44,300 women diagnosed each year, of which around 13,500 (a third) are aged 70 and over. The older you are – the more likely you are to get it.

This campaign aims to get more women with breast cancer diagnosed at an early stage by raising awareness of the symptoms so it’s important to get to know how your breasts look and feel normally, so that you will find it easier to spot something unusual.

A lump isn’t the only sign of breast cancer. If you do notice any changes to your breast you should make an appointment to see your doctor straight away. It might not be anything serious, but if it is, getting a diagnosis early can make a real difference.

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Have your say!

Conditions for which over the counter items should not routinely be prescribed in primary care

NHS England has launched a public consultation on reducing prescribing of over-the-counter medicines for 33 minor, short-term health concerns.

From June 2016 until June 2017 the NHS spent approximately £569 million on prescriptions for medicines which could have been purchased over the counter from a pharmacy, or other outlets such as a supermarket.

These prescriptions include items for a condition:

  • That is considered to be self-limiting and so does not need treatment as it will heal of its own accord;
  • Which lends itself to self-care, i.e. that the person suffering does not normally need to seek medical care but may decide to seek help with symptom relief from a local pharmacy and use an over the counter medicine

NHS England has partnered with NHS Clinical Commissioners to carry out the consultation, which is intended to help produce a national framework for CCGs to use.

The consultation is seeking your views on the proposals and is open until 14 March 2018.

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Campaign 

Know the signs of a stroke and act F.A.S.T.

We are encouraging you to learn the F.A.S.T. test to help you identify the early signs of a stroke and save more lives.

 

 

 

The F.A.S.T. test identifies the three most common symptoms of a stroke and the right action to take:

Face: Can the person smile? Has their mouth or eye drooped?

Arms: Can the person raise both arms?

Speech: Can the person speak clearly and understand what you are saying?

Time: call 999

If you recognise any single one of these symptoms of stroke, in yourself or others – CALL 999 straightaway. The sooner somebody who is having a stroke gets urgent medical attention, the better their chances of a good recovery.

Your pharmacy can help!

Your pharmacy team can help you with minor health concerns. Visit our website to find out where your nearest pharmacy is: http://www.wiltshireccg.nhs.uk/local-services/pharmacies

Community pharmacists and pharmacy technicians are qualified healthcare professionals who can offer clinical advice and over the counter medicines to effectively and safely manage a range of minor health concerns.

 

Including:

  • Sore throats
  • Coughs
  • Colds
  • Tummy troubles
  • Teething

Every pharmacist is trained in managing minor illnesses and providing health and wellbeing advice, so they are the right person to see for minor health concerns.

With over 12,000 pharmacies open every day of the week in England, and many offering extended opening hours in the evenings and weekends, it is easy to find a pharmacy close to you.

Pharmacists are healthcare experts who can give you clinical advice, right there and then, and if your symptoms are more serious, they can ensure you get the help you need...

Follow us

You can find Wiltshire CCG on social media – follow us and keep up to date with our latest news.

www.facebook.com/NHSWiltshireCCG www.twitter.com/NHSWiltshireCCG www.pinterest.com/NHSWiltshireCCG
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National survey shows improvements in women’s experiences of maternity care

Most women are having a positive experience of maternity care and treatment within the NHS, according to a survey of more than 18,000 people in England.

Published on Tuesday 30 January by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) the survey results reveal the responses from women who had given birth in February 2017 in services run by 130 NHS trusts across the country. They highlight improvements in areas such as choice of where to give birth, quality of information and access to help and support after giving birth.

Women were asked questions about all aspects of their maternity care from the first time they saw a clinician or midwife, during labour and birth, through to the care provided at home in the weeks following the arrival of their baby.

The results show that across the country, women were generally more positive about their experiences at every stage of their care, with most responses having improved or stayed the same since the survey was last carried out in 2015.

The responses to the 2017 survey show a number of notable trends, including:

  • The proportion of women who said they were offered the choice of giving birth in a midwife-led unit or birth centre has increased by seven per cent since 2013 (35% in 2013; 41% in 2015; rising to 42% in 2017).
  • Over a third of women (38%) reported that they saw the same midwife at every antenatal appointment: a 4% increase since 2013.
  • 88% of women surveyed said that they were ‘always’ treated with dignity and respect during labour and birth compared to 86% who said this in 2015 (85% in 2013).
  • The majority of women (77%) reported that they were never left alone during the birth of their baby at a time when it worried them. This compares to 74% in 2015.
  • Almost six in 10 women (59%) said they could ‘always’ get help from a member of staff within a reasonable time while in hospital after the birth: an improvement of 5% since 2015.
  • 66% of women felt they were ‘always’ given the information or explanations they needed after birth before returning home (compared with 58% in 2013).
  • 98% of women said their midwife or health visitor asked them how they were feeling emotionally during their postnatal care; however, a smaller proportion (57%) of women said they were ‘definitely’ given enough information about potential emotional changes they might experience after giving birth.
  • While there has been an increase in the number of women who reported being offered the choice about where to have their antenatal checks compared to previous years (29% in 2013 rising to 31% in 2017), the majority of women in 2017 (69 %) said they were not given a choice about this aspect of their care.

Professor Ted Baker, CQC’s Chief Inspector of Hospitals, said: “This year’s survey shows some very positive results about the quality of maternity care being provided in the NHS. This is a testament to efforts and dedication of staff working hard to provide care for pregnant women and new mothers across the country.

“The survey identifies a number of encouraging data trends showing improvements in women’s experiences throughout pregnancy, during birth and postnatally, and it indicates a greater focus on women’s individual needs and choices.

 “However, the scope for continued improvement remains, particularly in relation to women’s choices about their antenatal care and ensuring enough information is available to support women through any emotional changes they might experience after giving birth.  

“Our own inspection work of maternity services so far shows that the majority of trusts are providing high quality care – with over 60 per cent of hospitals rated as either Good or Outstanding for maternity. However, this also highlights that further work is needed to narrow the variation that we know exists.

 “I hope that NHS trusts will reflect on their individual results to understand what women using their maternity services really think about the care and treatment they provide. This will help them to identify where they need to make changes to drive improvements in the quality of care for the benefit of all women and their families.”

The full results for England, as well as individual results for each trust are available on the CQC’s website at www.cqc.org.uk/maternitysurvey

 This is the fifth survey of its kind that CQC has carried out in order to help NHS trusts understand what women’s experiences are of their maternity care and to make improvements. The results are used by CQC as part of its wider monitoring of NHS trusts.