Help shape Perinatal Mental Health Services

NHS Wiltshire, Swindon and BaNES Clinical Commissioning Groups and  Avon & Wiltshire Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust invite you to attend an event to provide you with an overview of current service provision and to hear your views on the proposal to introduce a specialist community perinatal mental health service in Wiltshire, Swindon and Bath.

Events are being held on the following days:

Wednesday 13 June 2018
Time: 2.00 – 4.00 pm
Location: Wyvern Theatre, Theatre Square, Swindon, SN1 1QN

Thursday 14 June 2018
Time: 2.00 – 4.00 pm
Location: Rose and Crown Hotel, Harnham Road, Salibsury, SP2 8JQ

Friday 15 June 2018
Time: 2.00 – 4.00 pm
Location: Hilton Hotel, Walcot Street, Bath, BA1 5BJ

Refreshments will be provided on arrival. 

If you would like to attend any of these events to help us shape and improve the future of perinatal mental health services, please book a place by sending an email to:  wiltshire.pimhevent@nhs.net

Crèche facilities are available; please let us know if you want to use this service when confirming your attendance as there are limited places which will be applied on a first come first served basis.   

Download poster here

Improved access to Wiltshire Children’s Community Services

Virgin Care is making it easier to access Wiltshire Children’s Community Services, enabling children and their families to get the help they need more efficiently.

The new Single Point of Access (also known as SPA) – a single website, telephone number, email and postal address for all referrals and questions about the services Virgin Care runs on behalf of the local authority and the NHS – launched this week.

The SPA will be the first point of contact for children, young people, families, GPs and health and social care professionals to reach and access child health guidance and support from Wiltshire Children’s Community Services.

People can contact the team on 0300 247 0090, via email vcl.wiltshirespa@nhs.net or by visiting wiltshirechildrensservices.co.uk.

It’s the culmination of two years’ work improving services – developing clearer referral criteria and completing moves to four new, purpose designed hubs dedicated for both colleagues and children and families in Wiltshire – and also delivers another milestone on the organisation’s plans in implementing its five year roadmap to deliver improvements in patient care.

During this process a group of colleagues were recruited to join the team and trained in identifying referral routes across all services, to provide expert support and advice to the parents, carers and health and education professionals across Wiltshire.

 Val Scrase, Head of Operations for Wiltshire Children’s Community Services, said: “Our new Single Point of Access will help us provide a truly integrated referral and advice system, enabling our expert team to process referrals more quickly so people can begin their treatment sooner in the services they need.

“In setting up a SPA, we’re fulfilling one of the key requests made by parents and carers when the service was recommissioned. Children and families will now find services more accessible, with service delivery remaining the same with no changes made to the way they’re run.”

Ted Wilson, Director of Community Services and Joint Commissioning for NHS Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group said: “We are committed to ensuring that all children and young people with additional needs are identified early.  This new way of delivering integrated services is to enable children and their families to have easier access to care and support when they need it most.”

 

Drink wisely this weekend

There are plenty of excuses to have a few drinks this weekend – with a royal wedding and the FA Cup Final, and Wiltshire Council and Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group are asking people to enjoy the festivities safely.  

The Government’s guidelines state that men and women should not drink more than 14 units of alcohol each week, and with just three standard glasses of wine, or three pints of normal-strength beer amounting to seven units – half the recommended weekly maximum intake for an average adult it’s very easy to drink more than you realise.

Regularly exceeding the limit,  known as ‘binge drinking’, places an individual at greater risk of harming their liver, stomach, heart and brain function, and also increases the chances of you contracting several kinds of cancer.

Dr Lindsay Kinlin, GP at The Orchard Partnership said:
“We know that people can tend to drink more than usual when they are enjoying festivities, like the Royal wedding as everyone likes to let their hair down and enjoy the socialising that comes with it, but it’s easy to get carried away and have one drink too many.  We are not saying ‘Don’t drink’, but we are encouraging people to consider their health when consuming alcohol and to drink sensibly.“

To reduce your risk of binge drinking and allow you to celebrate the weekend’s events sensibly, we have some useful tips and advice on how to drink safely:

  • drink more slowly
  • drink with food
  • alternate with water or non-alcoholic drinks
  • plan ahead to avoid problems, such as making sure you can get home safely or have people you trust with you.

Further information can be found on the NHS Choices website

Many people forget that alcohol is also high in calories, and seven units of wine or beer can be the equivalent of eating a couple of burgers –  which takes almost an hour of running to burn.

Alcohol is known as ‘empty calories’ as it provides no nutritional value; do you know what’s in your drink? Visit Drink Aware to find out more.  

Jerry Wickham, Wiltshire Council’s cabinet member for public health said:
“It’s a great time of the year to arrange a get-together, whether it’s indoors with the TV tuned to the football or events at Windsor Castle, or outside with cold drinks.”

“But it’s also a good time to remember that heavy drinking carries consequences for health, and the best advice is to celebrate well – but celebrate wisely.”

If you would like free, confidential advice about your drinking, please contact the Swindon and Wiltshire Active Recovery Service here.

For more useful information please visit the alcohol concern website.  

 

 

Wiltshire Dying Well Community Charter

Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group has launched its ‘Wiltshire Dying Well Community Charter’ to coincide with Dying Matters Awareness week (14-20 May) and is appealing to local companies and organisations to sign up to the charter and make a commitment to support their staff towards the end of their life. 

The Charter encourages a community-wide approach to support people who are affected by dying, and identifies simple steps employers can take to demonstrate their commitment to supporting their staff and their loved ones.

Dr Helen Osborn, GP at Courtyard Surgery in Lavington and Wiltshire End of Life Programme Board member explains, “The Charter has been developed to help bring greater understanding of the problems faced by working people who have been diagnosed with a life-limiting illness, or who care for people who are approaching the end of their lives.”

Signing up to the Charter is easy and doesn’t cost anything. Businesses are simply asked to commit to demonstrating their support for the Charter by signposting employees, volunteers or students to additional support resources and embedding supportive practices within their organisations for people who are affected.

Helen added, “The Charter will help local businesses ensure they have the best possible resources for their workforce and show that they are committed to supporting their employees who may be trying to balance their work commitments with the difficulties they face at home.”

The Charter is led by the National Council for Palliative Care and its ideas and commitments were recognised by many local organisations who came together to look at how we could create a Wiltshire Charter. Organisations involved in the original development of the Charter and who have already signed up to supporting their staff are: Dorothy House Hospice Care, Great Western Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Healthwatch Wiltshire, Prospect Hospice, Public Health Wiltshire, Royal United Hospitals Bath NHS Foundation Trust, Salisbury Hospice Charity, Salisbury NHS Foundation Trust, Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group and Wiltshire Health and Care.

The Wiltshire Dying Well Community Charter was developed in 2017 after consulting with local people about the Wiltshire End of Life Care Strategy.

Wiltshire Dying Well Community Charter, visit www.wiltshireccg.nhs.uk or email wiltshire.dyingwell@nhs.net.

Funding available for delivering a ‘step change’ in positive mental health and wellbeing within Wiltshire

NHS Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group is inviting bids from all stakeholders, including the voluntary and third sector, of up to £50,000 for delivering a ‘step change’ in positive mental health and wellbeing within Wiltshire.

Ted Wilson, Director of Community Services and Joint Commissioning for NHS Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group said,
“We are pleased to be able to offer these non-recurrent funds to support initiatives that aim to enable people to be more positive and confident about their mental health. We hope that the success of these initiatives will be a catalyst for future collaboration and support.”

Wiltshire CCG is aspiring to fund a number of different community based initiatives that support national and local priorities of increased focus on prevention and keeping well. Proposals for the funding could be smaller bids in a defined area of the county to larger multi-agency bids that cover the whole of Wiltshire, if agencies want to work together to apply collaboratively. 

Bids are welcome from those with an interest in delivering services where they are able to:

  • Develop and model a responsive preventative approach to mental health
  • Build on community resilience where individuals see themselves as part of a mutually beneficial collective, which aims to improve personal wellbeing through social interaction and inclusion
  • Encourage joint working and collaboration across agencies delivering services
  • Demonstrate an innovative and scalable approach to community based care that promotes independence
  • Be able to demonstrate benefits in 1 year

Applications will need to demonstrate how funds will be used to deliver the project and the bid also need to fully describe the expected outcomes.

Proposals for the funding should be made using the application form which can be downloaded from www.wiltshireccg.nhs.uk. The closing date for submission is 5pm on Friday 15 June 2018.

All proposals will be reviewed by an expert panel, including commissioning and GP leads and people with experience of mental health issues.  Successful applicants will be informed by 30 June 2018.

Stay safe in the sun

Summer’s almost here and with temperatures starting to soar, Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group and Wiltshire Council are supporting Sun Awareness Week (14-20 May) by offering advice to people in Wiltshire on how to stay safe in the sun.

Many of us enjoy spending time in the sun, but you can burn when you least expect it. Sitting in the garden, walking the dog or going for a run are just a few activities where you can be caught off guard.

Dr Richard Sandford-Hill, GP at Market Lavington Surgery and Chair of Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group, said:
“Although a moderate amount of sun exposure is recommended because it provides essential vitamin D, too much sun can be damaging. Don’t forget; you can still burn if it’s cloudy or overcast and while sunburn is usually short-lived and mild, it’s important to take precautions to avoid it because it can increase the chances of developing skin cancer later in life.”

How to protect yourself from sunburn

You can help safeguard your skin from the harmful effects of the sun by following these simple steps.

  • Cover up when you are out in the sun – wear loose clothing and a wide-brimmed hat to protect as much skin as possible and protect your eyes with sunglasses that block at least 99% of UV light.
  • Use a sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher and at least 4-star UVA protection and reapply every 2 hours and after swimming.
  • Seek shade and limit your direct exposure to the sun, especially between 11am and 3pm when UV rays are at their strongest.
  • Avoid tanning beds and sunlamps – both cause serious long-term damage and contribute to skin cancer.
Dr Sandford-Hill added:
“It’s important to enjoy the sun safely by keeping hydrated and when you are out remember to carry a hat, sunscreen and sunglasses with you for protecting yourselves from the sun’s harmful rays.”
Jerry Wickham, Wiltshire Council cabinet member for public health said:
“Wiltshire in the sunshine is glorious and we want people to enjoy it, but it can be easy to underestimate the strength of the sun when you’re outside, and you may not realise you are getting burnt.  If you feel you have sunburn, you should get out of the sun as soon as possible by heading indoors or into a shady area.”

What to do if you have sunburn

If you do have minor sunburn, you can treat this at home by cooling the skin down by having a cold bath or shower and then applying soothing after sun or calamine lotion to moisturise your skin.  You could also visit your local pharmacy for advice on treatment to help ease your symptoms and reduce inflammation.

Drinking plenty of fluids, will help cool you down and prevent you from getting dehydrated, and painkillers such as ibuprofen or paracetamol will help relieve any pain.

If you start to feel unwell or have any concerns about your sunburn, particularly if you are burnt over a large area, have blistering or swelling of the skin, chills, dizziness, sickness or a high temperature of 38c or above, call NHS 111 – they are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

If you notice any changes to your skin after being out in the sun, including a new mole, growth or lump or you have any moles or freckles that have changed in size, shape or colour, you should go and get them seen by your GP.  Skin cancer is much easier to treat if it’s found early.

For further information on how to keep safe in the sun, visit: www.wiltshireccg.nhs.uk

Don’t let hay fever ruin your day!

Hay fever affects millions of people in the UK and is mainly caused by pollen, and Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group is offering advice on how to minimise the symptoms for people who suffer from the condition.

Many of us will be spending more time outdoors with the arrival of Spring, either in our gardens or local parks, and suffers will soon start to feel the effects of itchy, red or watery eyes, a runny or blocked nose, sneezing fits, an itchy throat, mouth, nose and ears or a cough.

Dr Andrew Girdher, GP at Box Surgery advises:
“The best way to control hay fever is with antihistamines and these can easily be bought from local pharmacies or supermarkets very cheaply and starting to take them now so they get into your system will really be of benefit.”

“Visiting a local pharmacy is your best option. You can speak to the pharmacist; who is an expert in medications and can advise you on the best treatment. They can also offer advice on how to avoid hay fever triggers. If the pharmacist feels that the problem is something different which might require a review with a GP, they will recommend this.”

Other ways to help reduce the effects of hay fever include:

  • Wearing wraparound sunglasses when outdoors to protect the eyes
  • Showering and changing your clothes after being outdoors will help stop the spread of pollen through your home
  • Putting a small amount of petroleum jelly in your nose helps to trap pollen grains
  • Keeping an eye on the weather forecasts and staying indoors to avoid going out when the pollen count is high
Dr Girdher added:
“We are encouraging local residents to self-care and buy this low-cost medication themselves, as you do not need a prescription from your doctor, which can cost the NHS considerably more.”

“Self-care is an important part of keeping well and having a well-stocked medicine cabinet can help people, not just treat hay fever but also treat minor illness and injuries themselves, at home, without the need to see a GP.”

As well as your pharmacist, you can also get health advice through NHS 111 and the NHS choices website – www.nhs.uk

World Immunisation Week – Is your child protected?
23 – 29 April 2018

Healthy Living begins with pre-school Vaccinations

This week is World Immunisation Week and Wiltshire Council and NHS Wiltshire CCG are reminding parents and carers the importance of vaccinating their child against a host of serious diseases.   

The vaccinations which children receive in their early years, between birth and when they first go to school, give them safe and effective protection against infections such as meningitis, diphtheria, polio, measles and mumps.  If a child isn’t vaccinated, they are at a higher risk of falling ill.

The uptake of childhood immunisations across Wiltshire is generally good and a vast majority of parents do ensure their child has been fully protected, but there are many children who are missing doses and are therefore at risk.

We want to ensure we give our children the best start in life. We are encouraging parents to protect their families by ensuring their children receive the right vaccines at the right time. It’s important that children have all the required vaccinations prior to starting school. If parents are unsure of their child’s vaccination status, please speak to your GP practice or other child health care professional to make sure your child is up to date.”

We would like to remind all parents to ensure their children have their MMR second dose before 5 years old as this protects them from Measles, Mumps and Rubella, and DTap/IPV Booster which protect against Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis and Polio. These diseases are in circulation and an infection can cause serious compilations, particularly for a child.  But it is not only the child who is protected, vaccination programmes protect the whole population by making it harder for a disease to spread to others.

For further information about vaccinations and to download a personalised vaccination calendar please visit the NHS Choices website.

April 2018

Contents

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Welcome

Hello,

Welcome to April’s edition of ‘in touch’.

Our NHS will soon be celebrating its 70th birthday. All those years ago who would ever have imagined what healthcare would look like now.  The illnesses that we can treat and many of the operations and procedures that needed weeks of recovery have become routine, done in a day and carried out at a local hospital or even a GP surgery!

In this issue the very nature of how and where care is provided, whether that’s in our hospitals, community clinics or GP surgeries continues to evolve. We want to mark this occasion by sharing your memories and reminiscences of the NHS, if you have a story or photo to share, please get in touch – NHS70.wccg@nhs.net.

Earlier this month it was confirmed that the GP led health centre for Devizes can move to its next phase, which is great news. There still remains a considerable amount of detailed planning work to be undertaken and we will keep you updated about the development in future issues of ‘ in touch’.

We are discussing end of life care in this issue. Talking about death is still a taboo subject that so many people choose to ignore. However, talking about death as well as planning for it may not be easy, but it can help us to make the most of life and spare our loved ones from making difficult decisions on our behalf.  

With the arrival of Spring and long awaited sunshine I hope you are enjoying getting out and about in the Wiltshire countryside. We’ve included some information about how to recognise ‘ticks’ and precautions to take to prevent you from being bitten because they are prevalent at this time of year. We hope you find it useful.

Linda

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In the news!

Major step forward to development of Devizes Health Centre

Earlier this month, after a commitment of £7million to funding by NHS Property Services , it was confirmed that the GP led health centre for Devizes can move to its next phase.

Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group is leading the project which aims to deliver significant benefit to patients care by creating a modern and sustainable facility for the people of Devizes and the surrounding areas. The commitment to funding from NHS Property Services to fund the construction costs comes as outline planning permission for the development from Wiltshire Council is expected later this month.

Dr Richard Sandford-Hill, Chairman of Wiltshire CCG and lead GP for the project said:

“It’s really exciting to see that the Devizes Health Centre project is taking a significant step forward, and I’m delighted on behalf of the five Devizes GP practices and the CCG. The commitment from NHS Property Services means it’s all systems “go” to work towards the implementation of this important, long awaited scheme that will provide modern, fit for purpose premises for the delivery of healthcare for the people of the Devizes community area. There’s still a lot of work to do, and we look forward to the outcome of the Outline Planning Application, but we’re extremely confident now that we’re well on the way to achieving what we set out to do on behalf of our patients”.

The next step in the project will involve us concluding the outline business case, including a commitment to fund the future costs of running the health centre. If the outline business case is approved, work on developing the detailed design of the scheme can be begin to inform the full business case, which would then need to be approved by us and NHS England.

The health centre development is part of a wider scheme that involves the release of land at Marshall Road for housing, and, in due course, the outdated community hospital in the town.

We will keep you updated on the development of the health centre in future issues of the newsletter.

Help us celebrate 70 years of the NHS

This year marks the 70th anniversary of the National Health Service as it celebrates its birthday on 5 July 2018.

It’s an organisation woven into the very fabric of our way of life with each and every one of us using its services in some shape or form at some time.

To get here from 1948, the NHS has been constantly evolving and adapting to meet changing needs and expectations. All those years ago who would ever have imagined that we would be able to map the human brain, carry out heart transplants and immunise against so many diseases.

We want to mark the occasion by sharing local people’s memories and reminiscences of the NHS – either because they have worked for the service, or have received NHS treatment over the last 70 years. In particular, we are keen to hear from anyone who was born on 5th July 1948 and shares the same birthday as the NHS.

People can share their memories and photos by emailing the Communications Team at NHS70.wccg@nhs.net or by post to Communications, Wiltshire CCG, Southgate House, Pans Lane, Devizes, Wiltshire, SN10 5EQ. If you are sending any original photographs and would like them returned, please include your name and contact address.

Founded on the principle of free, high quality health care for all the NHS has evolved to meet our changing needs through new treatments, pioneering surgeries and technical innovations – helping us to live longer and better lives. None of this would be possible without the skill, dedication and compassion of NHS staff, as well as the many volunteers, charities and communities that support us and work tirelessly to provide care and support for everyone.

Do get in touch if you:
You share the same birthday as the NHS – were you one of the first babies to be born on 5 July 1948 in the NHS? You have recollections of working for the local NHS in Wiltshire (past and present) during the last 70 years You have received treatment or care from the NHS in Wiltshire and would like to share your story You can share any memories of our hospitals in Wiltshire, particularly if you have any old photographs of our hospitals (past and present) or the staff who worked in them We are especially interested in any memories and photographs from 1948, the year the NHS was founded and to hear from those who were born in 1948

Annual General Meeting

We are holding our annual general meeting in the conference room at Southgate House, Pans Lane, Devizes on Tuesday 26 June starting at 9.30am.

This event provides you with the opportunity to learn about what the clinical commissioning group has achieved in the past year and allows you to ask questions and find out more about our plans for the future – You can also pick up a copy of our annual report and accounts on the day.

Doors will be open from 9am for registration, and the AGM will take place between 9.30 – 10.30am.

If you would like to attend the AGM, please email tracy.torr@nhs.net by Friday 15 June 2018.


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Focus on End of Life Care

End of life care

Being told that you or someone you love and care for has a life limiting illness is tough news to receive. The care an individual needs at this time will be focused upon supporting them to have the best possible quality of life, independence and control over their life and care.

We believe that care at the end of a person’s life is vitally important and know that there is only one chance to get it right. Our end of life strategy sets out our local vision, which is for all patients at the end of life, together with those closest to them, are able to express their needs and wishes, and that as far as clinically appropriate, these needs and wishes are met.

What is end of life care?

Palliative and end of life care is about treatment and care focusing on the need of the whole person as well as their family, carers and friends. It is not just about managing pain and other symptoms but includes support to deal with emotional needs, social and spiritual needs, care in bereavement and help dealing with the financial effects of facing and of life situation.

End of life care includes palliative care, but can start earlier. If you have a terminal illness, or are approaching the end of your life, it may be a good idea to make plans in advance for the future of your care. Planning ahead in this way is sometimes called advance care planning. It involves thinking and talking about your wishes for how you are cared for in the final months of your life.

People usually carry out advance care planning because they have condition that is expected to get worse, which may mean they will not be able to make decisions, or communicated their decisions in the future. However, anyone can plan for their future care, whether they are approaching the end of their life or not. Advance care planning can help you let people know your wishes and feelings while you still can. Your wishes and preferences can then be shared with your family, carers, GP and others as appropriate.

Palliative care helps to make you as comfortable as possible by relieving pain and other distressing symptoms while providing psychological, social and spiritual support for you and your family or carers. This is called holistic approach to care, as it deals with the ‘whole’ person rather than just one aspect of their care.

Talking about death doesn’t bring death closer. It’s about planning for life. Without communication and understanding, death and terminal illness can be a lonely and stressful experience, both for the person who is dying and for their friends and family. There may be practical matters as well as care issues. Though hard to start these conversations, most people find it a great relief once it’s brought up.

Further information

Your GP is a good place to start if you want to discuss end of life, but you can also find lots of helpful information online:

Macmillan Cancer Support – advice and support for end of life
Dying matters – general information about preparing for a good death for the public and professionals
Terminal illness support from Marie Curie – at some stages all of us have to face the fact that we (or our loved ones) have a life limiting condition and are coming towards the end of our lives
Prospect Hospice – our local hospice
NHS Choices – general information about end of life care
What to expect when someone important to you is dying – a guide for carers, families and friends of dying people
Palliative and end of life care – a factsheet from Marie Curie

 

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Campaign 

One You: Nutrition

Eating out has become very common place and a quarter of our calories intake comes from eating out, meaning many of us are consuming more calories than we realise – an average of 200 to 300 extra calories per day. Over time, these extra calories can creep up on us and cause an unhealthy weight gain.

Public Health England’s One You campaign aims to help you be more aware of the calories you consume on the go and is encouraging people to make healthier choices, whether you are picking up breakfast on the way to work, having lunch at your desk or buying everyday meals.

This calorie creep is contributing to our county’s obesity problem which causes a range of health issues, including heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and some cancers.

One simple tip can help you make healthier choices while out and about – aim for 400-600-600. Try and stick to around 400 calories for breakfast, 600 calories for lunch and 600 calories for dinner, plus a couple of healthier snacks and drinks in-between.

So if you are looking to eat a little healthier, try a healthier choice today and aim for 400-600-600, because there is only One You: Nutrition.

Beware, ticks are lurking!

With the arrival of Spring, the CCG is advising you to brush up on your knowledge of ticks, what they are, where they live, the diseases they can carry, and how to minimise your risk of infection.

Ticks are small, spider like creatures that feed on the blood of animals, including people. They can be found in woodlands, grasslands, moorland, heathland and some urban parks and gardens.

Ticks are present in most parts of the country and are about the size of a poppy seed, and whilst irritating, most tick bites are harmless however; some ticks are infected with bacteria which can cause Lyme disease.

Symptoms of Lyme disease can include:

A high temperature (fever), headaches, tiredness (fatigue), muscle and joint pain, chills and neck stiffness and a characteristic skin rash that looks like a bulls-eye.

To minimise your risk of being bitten, take these steps to help protect yourself:
  • Keep to paths and away from long grass or overgrown vegetation if possible, as ticks crawl up long grass in their search for a feed
  • Wear appropriate clothing in tick infested areas (long sleeved shirt and long trousers tucked into socks).  Light coloured fabrics are useful, as it is easier to see ticks against a light background
  • Consider using insect repellents, e.g. DEET
  • Inspect skin frequently and remove any attached ticks
  • At the end of the day, check again thoroughly for ticks, especially in skin folds
  • Make sure that children’s head and neck areas, including scalps, are properly checked 
  • Check that ticks are not brought home on clothes
  • Check that pets do not bring ticks into the home on their fur

If you have been bitten by a diseased tick, symptoms of Lyme disease usually appear between 3 and 30 days. You should make a GP appointment as soon as possible and remember to tell them you were bitten by a tick. More information on tick bites can be found on our website.

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Follow us

You can find Wiltshire CCG on social media – follow us and keep up to date with our latest news.

www.facebook.com/NHSWiltshireCCG www.twitter.com/NHSWiltshireCCG www.pinterest.com/NHSWiltshireCCG
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Wiltshire residents urged to reduce their risk of Type 2 diabetes

The Healthier You: NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme (NDPP) is launching a Diabetes Prevention week campaign from 16 – 22 April 2018, and Wiltshire residents are being urged to eat healthily and be more active in order to help reduce their risk of type 2 diabetes. 

The campaign is also aiming to raise the awareness of the causes of Type 2 diabetes and the complications associated with it.

Diabetes is a long-term condition that affects the body’s ability to process sugar or glucose.  Early symptoms of diabetes include feeling very thirsty, feeling very tired and experiencing blurred vision. 

Diabetes can have serious health consequences; however, with careful management, people with diabetes can continue to lead full, healthy and active lives.

Type 2 diabetes is linked to lifestyle and it is estimated that over five million people in England are at high risk of developing the condition which in many cases can be prevented, so now more than ever is the time to support people to reduce their risk of developing the condition, as the need for prevention has never been greater.

Dr Andrew Girdher, GP at Box Surgery said,
“The Diabetes Prevention Programme offers a proven approach to support people who have been identified as being at risk to maintain a healthy weight and be more active; two factors which can significantly reduce the risk of developing the condition.

Participants learn how to eat healthily, add physical activity to their routine, manage stress, stay motivated and solve problems that can get in the way of healthy changes.”

If you have been told you are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, are registered at a GP practice in Wiltshire and haven’t already been referred to the programme, you can ask your GP or nurse to refer you.

If you haven’t been told you are at risk, you could go to www.riskscore.diabetes.co.uk to get an estimate of your risk of developing type 2 diabetes and if you are, ask your GP or practice nurse for a blood test to check your blood sugar levels. 

You can find out more about the Diabetes Prevention Programme at www.england.nhs.uk/ndpp

Help us celebrate 70 years of the NHS

This year marks the 70th anniversary of the National Health Service (NHS) as it celebrates its birthday on July 5 2018.  In the seven decades since it was founded in 1948 hundreds of millions of people have benefited from its services.

You can find us on social media – follow us and keep up to date with our latest posts as we celebrate the decades of the NHS during our countdown to the NHS’s 70th birthday on 5 July 2018.

    

 

Wiltshire CCG wants to mark the occasion by sharing local people’s memories and reminiscences of the NHS – either because they have worked for the service, or have received NHS treatment over the last 70 years.  In particular, the CCG is keen to hear from anyone who was born on 5th July 1948 and shares the same birthday as the NHS.

Dr Richard Sandford-Hill, Chair of Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group said,
“We’re welcoming stories and photographs from patients, staff, volunteers – anyone who has a memory to share and a story to tell”. 

People can share their memories and photos by emailing the Communications Team on NHS70.wccg@nhs.net or by post to Communications, Wiltshire CCG, Southgate House, Pans Lane, Devizes, Wiltshire, SN10 5EQ.  If you are sending any original photographs and would like them returned, please include your name and contact address.

Founded on the principle of free high quality health care for all, the NHS has evolved to meet our changing needs through new treatments, pioneering surgeries and technical innovations – helping us live longer and better lives.

None of this would be possible without the skill, dedication and compassion of NHS staff, as well as the many volunteers, charities and communities that support us and work tirelessly to provide care and support for everyone.

Please get in touch if:

  • You share the same birthday as the NHS – were you one of the first babies to be born on 5 July 1948 in the NHS?
  • You have recollections of working for the local NHS in Wiltshire (past and present) during the last 70 years
  • You have received treatment or care from the NHS in Wiltshire and would like to share your story
  • You can share any memories of our hospitals in Wiltshire, particularly if you have any old photographs of our hospitals (past and present) or the staff who worked in them
  • We are especially interested in any memories and photographs from 1948, the year the NHS was founded – and to hear from those who were born in 1948.

Don’t let ticks ruin your outside fun this Spring!

With the arrival of Spring Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group is advising people to brush up on their knowledge of ticks, tiny spider-like creatures found in woodland and long grass, to minimise their risk of infection, especially during outdoor activities, like camping or hiking.

Ticks are present in most parts of the country and can be found in forests, woodland, heaths, moorland areas and urban parks.  Whilst irritating, most tick bites are harmless however, some ticks are infected with bacteria which can cause Lyme disease.

Dr Lindsay Kinlin, said
“Ticks that can transmit Lyme disease are very small – about the size of a poppy seed – and can easily be overlooked, so it is important to check regularly for attached ticks on the skin. 

Ticks prefer warm, moist places on your body, especially the groin area, waist, arm pits, behind the knee and along the hair line, so look out for anything as tiny as a freckle or a speck of dirt.”

Most ticks do not carry the infection, but if one is found it should be removed promptly.  Infected ticks are unlikely to transmit Lyme disease if they are removed in the early stages of attachment, generally the tick must be attached to an individual for 36 to 48 hours or more before it can spread the disease.  They can be removed with tweezers or special tick hooks, by pulling them gently upwards away from the skin.

To minimise the risk of being bitten, take these steps to protect yourself:

  • Keep to paths and away from long grass or overgrown vegetation if possible, as ticks crawl up long grass in their search for a feed
  • Wear appropriate clothing in tick infested areas (long sleeved shirt and long trousers tucked into socks). Light coloured fabrics are useful, as it is easier to see ticks against a light background
  • Consider using insect repellents, e.g. DEET
  • Inspect skin frequently and remove any attached ticks
  • At the end of the day, check again thoroughly for ticks, especially in skin folds
  • Make sure that children’s head and neck areas, including scalps, are properly checked
  • Check that ticks are not brought home on clothes
  • Check that pets do not bring ticks into the home on their fur

If you have been bitten by a diseased tick, symptoms of Lyme disease usually appear between 3 and 30 days and are similar to those of influenza.  If you are having flu-like symptoms, head-aches, muscle pain or joint pain, accompanied by a bulls-eye rash pattern on your skin you should make a GP appointment as soon as possible and remember to tell them you were bitten by a tick.

Annual General Meeting

Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group will be holding its Annual General Meeting at Southgate House, Pans Lane, Devizes on Tuesday 26 June at 9.30am.

Our AGM offers members of the public, patients and staff the opportunity to hear about what the CCG has achieved in the past year and allows people to come along and ask questions and find out more about our plans for the future.

Copies of the annual report and accounts will also be available on the day.

Doors will be open for registration at 9am and the AGM will take place between 9.30– 10.30am. 

Refreshments will be available from registration.

If you would like to attend the AGM, please email communications.wiltshireccg@nhs.net

Know where to go to find the right healthcare this Easter

Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group is advising people to be prepared so they know where to go for healthcare advice and treatment over the Easter bank holiday; helping them to access the right service at the right time according to their needs.

Dr Richard Sandford-Hill, Chair of Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group said,
“Easter is a great time to get out and about with friends and family, particularly if the weather is good, and no-one wants illness or injury to affect their plans. We’re encouraging people to be well-prepared ahead of the bank holiday and know where to go to access the right healthcare that you might need. To help with this Wiltshire CCG has an easy to use ‘Around the clock healthcare leaflet’ available to download from our website

Bank holidays are extremely busy times for the NHS and we are asking people in Wiltshire to use our local services wisely this Easter so that our emergency services, such as 999, are available for those who need them most.

Healthcare services in Wiltshire

Pharmacists – are experts on medicines and how they work. They can also offer advice on common complaints such as coughs, colds, aches and pains and other health issues and help to decide whether it’s necessary to see a doctor. Find your nearest pharmacy here.

Minor Injuries Units – are for patients with less serious injuries, such as sprains, cuts and grazes. No appointments are required and they are led by qualified nurse practitioners. Find out MIU opening times in Chippenham and Trowbridge here.

Salisbury walk-in centre – open from 6.30pm until 10pm week days, and 8am until 8pm weekends including bank holidays. The centre is run by a team of experienced doctors and nurses and is based on a first come first served basis, unless someone is acutely unwell and needs immediate attention. For details on how to find the Salisbury walk-in centre visit: http://www.salisburywalkincentre.co.uk.

NHS 111 – available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and calls to 111 are free from landlines and mobiles. It is staffed by a team of fully trained advisers, supported by experienced clinicians. Healthcare advice can be given over the telephone, or you may be directed to a local service if appropriate.

For life threatening situations serious injuries, loss of consciousness, chest pain or suspected stroke you should always call 999.

Dr Sandford-Hill continues,
“We also strongly recommend that people check that they have enough of their routine medication to see them through the four day weekend. If you need to order more, it is advisable to request it well in advance of the bank holiday to ensure that you receive it in time.”