Wiltshire Council and CCG praised for improving cervical screening attendance

We are among the 20% of local authorities praised by Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust, for comprehensive and targeted work to improve cervical screening attendance in Wiltshire. However, uptake of cervical screening is decreasing and currently at a 20 year low nationally – which leaves women at an increased risk of developing cancer.
Ben Anderson, portfolio holder for Public Health said: “We know that cervical screening saves lives. It’s very important women are encouraged to attend their screening appointments so that any changes can be detected and investigated at an early stage.  Being recognised like this gives us confidence that we’re doing things the right way. Prevention is always better than cure and we’re determined to do everything we can to ensure cervical screening attendance continues to rise in Wiltshire.”

Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust recently published a report which highlighted areas, including Wiltshire, that have implemented good practice to improve cervical screening uptake. It urges other CCGs, local authorities and GP practices across England to work together to plan activities and interventions to increase cervical screening coverage.

Dr Richard Sandford-Hill, Chair of Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group and GP at Market Lavington Surgery added: “It is really important to continue to encourage women in Wiltshire to attend regular survival screening.  This allows us to pick up pre-cancerous changes in the cervix before they develop into cancer, meaning these cells can then be treated.  Screening only takes a few minutes and can save many lives, so please do attend your screening appointment when invited.”

One in three women diagnosed with breast cancer each year are aged 70 or over

NHS Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group is supporting the national Be Clear on Cancer campaign and are urging women aged 70 or over to be aware of breast cancer symptoms.

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in England with around 44,600 women diagnosed every year. National figures show that around 9,500 women die from breast cancer each year and over half of these women are aged 70 and over (5,400). This equates to around 15 women aged 70 and over dying from breast cancer in England every day.

Dr Andy Hall, GP at Orchard Partnership said,
“Despite older women being at an increased risk of breast cancer, they are also more likely to delay in going to their GP with breast cancer symptoms. We are not just talking about a lump, if you notice any unusual or persistent changes to your breasts such as a change to a nipple, or to the skin or the shape of a breast, book an appointment with your doctor and have it investigated.”

It’s important for all women over 70 to not assume they are past it. Early diagnosis of breast cancer is crucial and means treatment is more likely to be successful.  If breast cancer is diagnosed at the earliest stage, it will increase their chances of survival.

Dr Hall continued,
“It’s important to carry on checking your breasts as you get older because the chance of being diagnosed with breast cancer increases with age. The earlier it’s caught the better, so know the symptoms, and don’t be afraid to visit your doctor if you are concerned about any potential signs.”

Possible signs of breast cancer include:

  • A lump or thickening in your breast or armpit
  • Change to the skin of your breast
  • Changes in the shape or size of your breast
  • Nipple changes
  • Nipple discharge
  • Pain in your breast or armpit
  • Any other unusual or persistent changes to your breasts

If you have any of these symptoms, your doctor will want to see you.

For more information on the signs and symptoms of breast cancer, please visit our campaign page

February 2018

Contents

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Welcome

Hello,

Welcome to February’s edition of ‘in touch’.

In this issue we’re excited to tell you about a new Children and Adolescent Mental Health service that starts on 1 April. Over 200 people across Wiltshire, Bath and North East Somerset and Swindon helped to shape the service which will support young people aged 0-18 years.

NHS England is working with NHS Clinical Commissioners on a public consultation to reduce prescribing of over the counter medicines for minor, short-term health concerns. Drugs like paracetamol can cost the NHS up to three times more on prescription than if patients bought them directly from a supermarket. The results from the consultation will inform national guidance on how such drugs are available in the future. What are your thoughts on buying some medication over the counter? Share your views by completing the survey.

Over the coming months we’ll be focusing on cancer types and the common signs to look out for. 

It’s very easy to ignore symptoms and put off going to see your doctor, but if you are worried you should book an appointment with your doctor straight away.

It may not be anything serious, but if it is cancer it’s important to find it early. See below for the campaigns we’re highlighting in this edition.

While Winter hasn’t quite left us yet the days are gradually getting longer and the sun is starting to brighten up our skies – Spring is nearly here!

Linda

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In the news!

New service to support children and young people with their emotional wellbeing

The views of over 200 individuals from across Bath and North East Somerset, Swindon and Wiltshire have helped shape a modern service for children and young people with emotional wellbeing and mental health problems.

The new Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) service starts on 1 April 2018 and will be delivered by Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust. The service be providing targeted and specialist mental health and wellbeing support to children and young people aged 0-18 years, which includes having timely access to an integrated system of co-ordinated and effective promotion, prevention, early intervention and community support and treatment.

Ted Wilson, Director of Community Services and Joint Commissioning for Wiltshire CCG said: “With valuable input from young people across Wiltshire, Bath and North East Somerset and Swindon we have commissioned a mental health service that will better suit their needs, be easier for them to access and will provide improved advice and support.”

National Survey shows improvements in women’s experiences of maternity care

Most women are having a positive experience of maternity care and treatment with the NHS, according to a survey of more than 18,000 people in England.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) survey results reveal responses from women who had given birth in February 2017 in services run by 130 NHS trusts across the country.

Women were asked questions about all aspects of their maternity care from the first time they saw a clinician or midwife, during labour and birth, through to the care provided at home in the weeks following the arrival of their baby. The results highlighted improvements in areas such as choice on where to give birth, quality of information and access to help and support after giving birth.

The full results for England as well as individual results for each trust are available on the CQC’s website.

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Focus on cancer!

More than one in three people in England will develop some form of cancer during their lifetime.

Cancer can start almost anywhere in the human body, which is made up of trillions of cells. Normally cells grow and divide to form new cells when the body needs them. When cancer develops, old or damaged cells survive when they should die, and new cells form when they are not needed. These extra cells can divide without stopping and may form growths called tumours. These cancerous cells can invade and destroy surrounding healthy tissue, including organs.

There are more than 200 different types of cancer, and each one is diagnosed and treated in a particular way. The four most common types of cancer diagnosed in England are:

Spotting the signs

It is important to be aware of any unexplained changes to your body. If you notice any changes to your body’s normal processes or unusual, unexplained symptoms – such as the sudden appearance of a lump, blood in your urine, or a change to your usual bowel habits, it’s important to see your doctor so they can investigate. The chances are it is nothing serious, but it might be something that needs attention and if diagnosed earlier, treatment can be a lot more successful.

Click here for more information on cancer and spotting the signs and symptoms.

We’re helping to raise awareness of cancer, so keep an eye out for information on the following campaigns in the next few issues of ‘in touch’:

Prostate Cancer Awareness Month
In the UK, about one in eight men will get prostate cancer at some point in their lives.

Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month
Ovarian cancer is the biggest gynaecological killer of UK women, as most women are diagnosed once the cancer has spread which makes treatment more challenging.

Be clear on cancer – breast cancer in women over 70 
In England, one in three women who get breast cancer are aged 70 or over.

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in England with around 44,300 women diagnosed each year, of which around 13,500 (a third) are aged 70 and over. The older you are – the more likely you are to get it.

This campaign aims to get more women with breast cancer diagnosed at an early stage by raising awareness of the symptoms so it’s important to get to know how your breasts look and feel normally, so that you will find it easier to spot something unusual.

A lump isn’t the only sign of breast cancer. If you do notice any changes to your breast you should make an appointment to see your doctor straight away. It might not be anything serious, but if it is, getting a diagnosis early can make a real difference.

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Have your say!

Conditions for which over the counter items should not routinely be prescribed in primary care

NHS England has launched a public consultation on reducing prescribing of over-the-counter medicines for 33 minor, short-term health concerns.

From June 2016 until June 2017 the NHS spent approximately £569 million on prescriptions for medicines which could have been purchased over the counter from a pharmacy, or other outlets such as a supermarket.

These prescriptions include items for a condition:

  • That is considered to be self-limiting and so does not need treatment as it will heal of its own accord;
  • Which lends itself to self-care, i.e. that the person suffering does not normally need to seek medical care but may decide to seek help with symptom relief from a local pharmacy and use an over the counter medicine

NHS England has partnered with NHS Clinical Commissioners to carry out the consultation, which is intended to help produce a national framework for CCGs to use.

The consultation is seeking your views on the proposals and is open until 14 March 2018.

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Campaign 

Know the signs of a stroke and act F.A.S.T.

We are encouraging you to learn the F.A.S.T. test to help you identify the early signs of a stroke and save more lives.

 

 

 

The F.A.S.T. test identifies the three most common symptoms of a stroke and the right action to take:

Face: Can the person smile? Has their mouth or eye drooped?

Arms: Can the person raise both arms?

Speech: Can the person speak clearly and understand what you are saying?

Time: call 999

If you recognise any single one of these symptoms of stroke, in yourself or others – CALL 999 straightaway. The sooner somebody who is having a stroke gets urgent medical attention, the better their chances of a good recovery.

Your pharmacy can help!

Your pharmacy team can help you with minor health concerns. Visit our website to find out where your nearest pharmacy is: http://www.wiltshireccg.nhs.uk/local-services/pharmacies

Community pharmacists and pharmacy technicians are qualified healthcare professionals who can offer clinical advice and over the counter medicines to effectively and safely manage a range of minor health concerns.

 

Including:

  • Sore throats
  • Coughs
  • Colds
  • Tummy troubles
  • Teething

Every pharmacist is trained in managing minor illnesses and providing health and wellbeing advice, so they are the right person to see for minor health concerns.

With over 12,000 pharmacies open every day of the week in England, and many offering extended opening hours in the evenings and weekends, it is easy to find a pharmacy close to you.

Pharmacists are healthcare experts who can give you clinical advice, right there and then, and if your symptoms are more serious, they can ensure you get the help you need...

Follow us

You can find Wiltshire CCG on social media – follow us and keep up to date with our latest news.

www.facebook.com/NHSWiltshireCCG www.twitter.com/NHSWiltshireCCG www.pinterest.com/NHSWiltshireCCG
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National survey shows improvements in women’s experiences of maternity care

Most women are having a positive experience of maternity care and treatment within the NHS, according to a survey of more than 18,000 people in England.

Published on Tuesday 30 January by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) the survey results reveal the responses from women who had given birth in February 2017 in services run by 130 NHS trusts across the country. They highlight improvements in areas such as choice of where to give birth, quality of information and access to help and support after giving birth.

Women were asked questions about all aspects of their maternity care from the first time they saw a clinician or midwife, during labour and birth, through to the care provided at home in the weeks following the arrival of their baby.

The results show that across the country, women were generally more positive about their experiences at every stage of their care, with most responses having improved or stayed the same since the survey was last carried out in 2015.

The responses to the 2017 survey show a number of notable trends, including:

  • The proportion of women who said they were offered the choice of giving birth in a midwife-led unit or birth centre has increased by seven per cent since 2013 (35% in 2013; 41% in 2015; rising to 42% in 2017).
  • Over a third of women (38%) reported that they saw the same midwife at every antenatal appointment: a 4% increase since 2013.
  • 88% of women surveyed said that they were ‘always’ treated with dignity and respect during labour and birth compared to 86% who said this in 2015 (85% in 2013).
  • The majority of women (77%) reported that they were never left alone during the birth of their baby at a time when it worried them. This compares to 74% in 2015.
  • Almost six in 10 women (59%) said they could ‘always’ get help from a member of staff within a reasonable time while in hospital after the birth: an improvement of 5% since 2015.
  • 66% of women felt they were ‘always’ given the information or explanations they needed after birth before returning home (compared with 58% in 2013).
  • 98% of women said their midwife or health visitor asked them how they were feeling emotionally during their postnatal care; however, a smaller proportion (57%) of women said they were ‘definitely’ given enough information about potential emotional changes they might experience after giving birth.
  • While there has been an increase in the number of women who reported being offered the choice about where to have their antenatal checks compared to previous years (29% in 2013 rising to 31% in 2017), the majority of women in 2017 (69 %) said they were not given a choice about this aspect of their care.

Professor Ted Baker, CQC’s Chief Inspector of Hospitals, said: “This year’s survey shows some very positive results about the quality of maternity care being provided in the NHS. This is a testament to efforts and dedication of staff working hard to provide care for pregnant women and new mothers across the country.

“The survey identifies a number of encouraging data trends showing improvements in women’s experiences throughout pregnancy, during birth and postnatally, and it indicates a greater focus on women’s individual needs and choices.

 “However, the scope for continued improvement remains, particularly in relation to women’s choices about their antenatal care and ensuring enough information is available to support women through any emotional changes they might experience after giving birth.  

“Our own inspection work of maternity services so far shows that the majority of trusts are providing high quality care – with over 60 per cent of hospitals rated as either Good or Outstanding for maternity. However, this also highlights that further work is needed to narrow the variation that we know exists.

 “I hope that NHS trusts will reflect on their individual results to understand what women using their maternity services really think about the care and treatment they provide. This will help them to identify where they need to make changes to drive improvements in the quality of care for the benefit of all women and their families.”

The full results for England, as well as individual results for each trust are available on the CQC’s website at www.cqc.org.uk/maternitysurvey

 This is the fifth survey of its kind that CQC has carried out in order to help NHS trusts understand what women’s experiences are of their maternity care and to make improvements. The results are used by CQC as part of its wider monitoring of NHS trusts.

New service to support children and young people with their emotional wellbeing and mental health

The views of children, teenagers, parents, carers and healthcare professionals have helped to shape a modern service for children and young people with emotional wellbeing and mental health problems.

The Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) provides targeted and specialist mental health and wellbeing support to children and young people aged 0-18 years.

The contract to deliver CAMHS was due for renewal and in a unique move Bath and North East Somerset, Swindon and Wiltshire joined forces to procure the new service to promote integrated working across the three areas as well as provide more seamless and better quality of care and support to children, young people and families.

The preferred bidder, Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust, has been awarded the contract and shall start providing the service from 1 April 2018.

As the specification for the new service was drawn up, more than 200 individuals from across Bath and North East Somerset, Swindon and Wiltshire (including children, young people, parents and carers, and multi-agency professionals) were consulted.

Their views have helped shape how children, young people and their families will have timely access to an integrated system of co-ordinated and effective promotion, prevention, early intervention and community support and treatment.

Kirstie Stage is a member of Youth Parliament for Wiltshire West and Wiltshire Assembly of Youth. She was one of the young people involved in advising commissioners on the new look service.

She said: “To play an active role in the consultation has reflected a positive message: professionals are asking for input and young people are being listened to seriously. Mental health is such a prevalent issue and by improving the CAMHS services, young people are able to access support and thrive.”

Laura Mayes, cabinet member for children’s services at Wiltshire Council said: “We are really grateful to the many people who gave us their valuable feedback to help shape how we provide this support to have a positive impact on young lives into the future. Our young people are growing up in a very different world to just a few years ago and it’s vital we have their views on how we can best support them.”

Ted Wilson, Director of Community Services and Joint Commissioning, Wiltshire CCG said: “With valuable input from young people across Wiltshire, Bath and North East Somerset and Swindon we have commissioned a mental health service that will better suit their needs, be easier for them to access and will provide improved advice and support.”

Donan Kelly, Interim Service Director for Children and Young People at Oxford Health, said: “We are delighted to be awarded the contract for providing Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services across Bath and North East Somerset, Swindon and Wiltshire.

“This builds upon the good work of the existing services that we have provided across the region, and going forward, the consultation and new contract provide the opportunity to make a real difference in the way services are delivered: we want to provide a seamless accessible service that also helps bring together wider community support to improve the overall emotional wellbeing and mental health of children, young people and their families.”

New group lets cancer patients have their say

People whose lives have been touched by cancer can now come together as part of a new group and have their collective voices listened to by experts from the Great Western Hospital.

The Swindon Cancer Partnership Group, which officially launches next month, will give cancer patients and/or their carers the opportunity to be involved in the development of local cancer services.

By meeting regularly, it’s hoped members of the group will not only be able to talk about their own cancer journey, but work with experts to influence how care is given in the future.

Lyndel Moore, Cancer Nurse Consultant, said:
This new group will provide local people with a forum in which they can have their voices at the very heart of the services we provide.

By listening to, and acting upon, the views of people affected by cancer, we are able to continually make the changes and improvements that will ensure our care is always of the highest standard.   

Our overall aim is for local people, who have lived the cancer journey, to have a hand in influencing the quality of the care and treatment given to others like them.  Whether it’s feeding back directly, taking part in focus groups or just filling out questionnaires, those people coming along can be involved in as much or as little as they like.

The Swindon Cancer Partnership Group will meet four times a year, with attendance open to any person who feels their experience can help make a difference to others.

Last year, a survey of more than 72,000 cancer patients highlighted the positive care happening at GWH.

Of the 438 Swindon patients who took part, the majority gave a favourable account of their experience, with GWH’s cancer care receiving an average score of 8.6 out of a possible ten.

 A special event to launch the group is being held on Wednesday 21 February 2018 in the Cherwell Education Room at Great Western Hospital between 3.15pm and 4.45pm. Please contact the GWH Cancer Team on 01793 646152 or at gwh.gwhcancerpartnership@nhs.net to register your interest.