House of Lords acknowledge good work of CCG
Click here to read a letter of praise from the Lord Prior of Brampton, Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for NHS Productivity on the progress and achievements of Wiltshire CCG to date.

How to access health care in Wiltshire this Christmas
With GP surgeries closed for several days over the festive period it’s vital that people who need help from NHS services this Christmas get the advice they need from the right person, in the right place, at the right time.

NHS Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group is asking everyone to follow these three simple steps if they need help:

1. Ask your pharmacist
Pharmacists are experts in many aspects of healthcare and can offer advice on a wide range of long term conditions and common illnesses such as coughs, colds and stomach upsets.

You don’t need an appointment and many have private consultation areas so they are a good first port of call if you’re feeling unwell. Your pharmacist will tell you if you need further medical attention.

2. Call 111
If your GP surgery is closed and you’re not sure where to go then you should make a free phone call to NHS 111, which is available 24/7.

An adviser will ask you questions to assess your symptoms and then give you the advice you need or direct you to the best service for you in your area.

3. A&E and 999 are for life threatening emergencies
A&E departments and the ambulance service are for life threatening emergencies such as loss of consciousness, suspected heart attacks, breathing difficulties or severe bleeding that cannot be stopped. A&E is likely to be extremely busy over the holidays with long waiting times so please call NHS 111 for advice first if you are not sure where to go.

A list of opening times for GP surgeries, pharmacies, dentists and opticians in Wiltshire over the Christmas break can be found here.

Wiltshire’s Health and Wellbeing Board up for award

A board which helps health and social care services in Wiltshire work seamlessly together to support healthy, independent living has been nominated for a prestigious award.

Wiltshire’s Health and Wellbeing Board has been shortlisted in the ‘Effective Health and Wellbeing Board’ category for the Local Government Chronicle Awards 2016, with the winner due to be announced at a ceremony on 16 March 2016.

Wiltshire’s Health and Wellbeing Board brings together all the leaders of the health and social care system in Wiltshire. It is chaired by Baroness Scott of Bybrook OBE, leader of Wiltshire Council with Dr Peter Jenkins, Chair of NHS Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), vice chair of the board.

The council and the CCG work closely together with partners through the board. NHS England is also represented together with Wiltshire’s Police and Crime Commissioner and Healthwatch Wiltshire.

The vision of the board is underpinned by recently agreed programmes such as the Better Care Plan, which was one of only five in the country to be fast tracked for sign off.

One particular success of the board’s work and Better Care Plan has been the ground-breaking work on developing an Urgent Care at Home plan which means professionals can facilitate rapid access to services 24 hours a day, seven days a week; and co-ordinate intermediate care and hospital discharge. The service provides health and social care support within one hour in times of crisis and helps prevent unnecessary hospital admissions. This has helped delayed transfers of care fall to zero in some months – a dramatic improvement on Wiltshire’s position.

Work is also continuing to make better use of estates, through the Health and Wellbeing Community Centres programme which will see vital health and care facilities co-located right at the heart of communities. This will lead to greater access to services for residents, as demonstrated at Springfield Community Campus in Corsham.

A recent positive independent peer review into the Health and Wellbeing Board stated: “You are doing all the right things and you are doing them well!”

Baroness Scott of Bybrook OBE, chair of the Health and Wellbeing Board and leader of Wiltshire Council said: “I’m delighted the board has been recognised in this way.

“Our strong partnership with NHS Wiltshire CCG and our others partners has seen some great improvements in the delivery of vital health and social care services and the benefits have been felt by residents up and down the county.

“However, we are not complacent and know there is still work to do. Together we will continue to strive to ensure that people of all ages who have health and social care needs get high quality joined-up support as quickly and efficiently as possible.”

Dr Peter Jenkins, Vice Chair of Wiltshire’s Health and Wellbeing Board and Chair of Wiltshire CCG comments: “The joint Health and Wellbeing Board provides a vital platform to ensure partnership working across health and social care and we’re encouraged by the transformational care we’ve established as a result. Our focus remains on continual improvement to ensure our vision to provide healthcare services as close to home as possible, is delivered.

“I’m pleased that our collaborative approach to health and social care  in Wiltshire has been recognised and I look forward to finding out in March if we’ve been successful.”

Ends

Notes to editors:

In shortlisting for the awards and deciding the winner, the panel will be judging nominees on:

  • Evidence of how health and social care commissioning has moved beyond their institutional boundaries
  • The extent to which the work of the board has had a demonstrable effect on outcomes
  • How HWBs’ vision has been translated into a set of effective priorities and actions

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New out of hours service for children in South Wiltshire

A new out of hours GP service for children in and around Salisbury has been launched this week. Parents of children aged 0-10 can now book a same day appointment to see a GP at the Salisbury Walk In Health Centre.

This extended service will provide out of hours GP health advice and treatment for minor illnesses and injuries and will provide parents with a local alternative to A&E when their child is ill.

Dr Chet Sheth, spokesperson for Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group and GP at St Anne Street practice comments: “We understand how worrying it is for parents to have a sick child especially when local GP surgeries are closed. Often the default for parents is to take their poorly child to A&E. This isn’t always the best place for them and quite often it’s local community health advice and treatment that is needed.

“This new out of hours service is designed to reduce some of the pressure seen at A&E over the winter months and to provide parents with accessible, local, health advice and treatment.

“At this stage this service is just a pilot, which will run until the end of March 2016. We’re hopeful that the pilot will see positive results both in take up and in reducing attendances at A&E for this particular age group.”

Parents should ring 111 in the first instance. If necessary the call handler will then advise parents to contact the Salisbury Walk In Centre to make a same day appointment. If however, your child has a serious or life threatening condition please call 999.

The service is available for children under 10 years old who live in the south of the county. The daily service will run Monday to Friday 18:00 – 22:00 and Saturday and Sunday 16:00  – 20:00. In the initial stages of the pilot during December the service will not run at the weekend. The Salisbury Walk in Centre can be found at Avon Approach, Salisbury, Wiltshire SP1 3SL.

Patients set to benefit from New Genomics Medicine Centre in the West of England

15 December 2015

Patients in the West of England are set to benefit from a new NHS Genomic Medicine Centre.

A partnership made up of NHS provider organisations in Bristol, Bath, Cheltenham and Gloucestershire, universities in the region, the West of England Academic Health Science Network, NHS commissioners and patient organisations has been designated the West of England NHS Genomic Medicine Centre (WEGMC).

Up and running by February 2016, the centre, based in Bristol, will be part of the three-year project, launched by the Prime Minister, to transform diagnosis and treatment for patients with cancer and rare diseases.

This involves collecting and decoding 100,000 human genomes – complete sets of people’s genes – that will enable scientists and doctors to understand more about specific conditions. It could allow personalisation of drugs and other treatments to specific genetic variants.

Clinicians from the hospitals involved will recruit potentially eligible patients. Then patients choosing to be involved will take part in a test which will then be processed in a lab at Southmead Hospital, before being sent nationally for sequencing.

Some of the patients involved could benefit from a quicker conclusive diagnosis for a rare and inherited disease or cancer because treatment may be targeted at a particular genetic change.

Life Sciences Minister George Freeman MP said,

“The opening of this centre, as part of our revolutionary 100,000 Genomes Project to sequence the genomes of NHS patients with cancer and rare diseases, underlines the UK’s position as a world leader in 21st century medicine.

“Patients are at the heart of the project. That’s why we have chosen NHS sites like this to sequence DNA on an unprecedented scale, which will bring better treatments to people with rare diseases and cancer in the West of England.”

Tony Gallagher, Chair of WEGMC, said

“This is an important step forward for patients and the development of future treatments in the West of England. Working together we have teams of dedicated and experienced doctors, nurses, counsellors, scientists, managers, commissioners and academics who are committed to realising the transformative possibilities that genomic medicine offers to patients in our area.”

Caroline Gamlin, NHS England South West Medical Director, said:

“This is a huge tribute to the quality of our medical science in the west. Our local doctors will help to create ground-breaking discoveries about diseases, predict who is susceptible and design personalised treatments to tackle them.”

The national project to sequence 100,000 genomes was announced by the Prime Minister in 2012 in a bid to transform diagnosis and treatment for patients with cancer and rare diseases in the fast-emerging field of genomic medicine. NHS England established 11 NHS Genomic Medicine Centres (GMCs) in 2014. A year on, two more GMCs have been announced – one for the West of England and the second in Yorkshire and Humber.

Professor Ruth Newbury-Ecob is a leading member of the West of England partnership. She works in the Clinical Genetics Service at University Hospitals Bristol which provides genetic services for Bristol, Bath Gloucestershire and Somerset. Specialising in rare diseases including inherited cardiac conditions, she works with colleagues  at the Bristol Royal Hospital for Children and the Bristol Heart Institute to provide specialist multidisciplinary care She works closely with the Regional Genetics Laboratory at North Bristol NHS Trust to develop new genetic testing, translating research findings into NHS services for patients across the UK. She said,

“Genomics has the potential to transform healthcare by developing a more tailored individualised approach to patient care and through better screening and targeting treatments to prevent development of diseases such as cancer and heart disease. The West of England partnership has brought together multiple interested parties for the first time to bring about this wonderful transformation in healthcare.”

Patients are involved in planning the service. Deborah Evans, Managing Director of the West of England Academic Health Science Network, said,

“In recent weeks I’ve been involved in interviews with people locally who have experienced rare diseases or cancer and their carers, and we have gathered very rich and useful insights that will help us plan our new services. It has been humbling and inspiring to hear first-hand these stories from people who, when faced with cancer or a rare familial disease, have not only coped with extraordinary life-changing challenges for themselves or their families, but still have the commitment to contribute more for other people through this research which will play such an important role in the future of medicine and treatment.” 

Tara Mistry from Bristol said:

“As someone with personal experience of cancer, with a diagnosis before the age of 40 and with two young daughters having grown up under the shadow of their mother’s surgery and subsequent treatments, this news of the Genomic Medicine Centre for the West of England is just fantastic.

“I’m so pleased that I and other patients have been involved in helping design aspects of this new service from a patient perspective because we have enormous interest in making this work for the prevention of illness in our children and communities. It’s so good to feel that this service can help target treatments to individuals and so make us less sick while being treated and hopefully eliminate the disease altogether – so my daughters and others may not have to go through this in their lives. I look forward to being more involved as this project unfolds.”

Professor Aniko Varadi from the University of the West of England in Bristol will lead the work in education and training. She said, “It is critical that the workforce in the NHS is educated and trained to ensure the effective delivery of genomic technologies. The education and training programme supports the delivery of the 100,000 Genomes Project but it goes well beyond that. The ultimate aim is that the next generation of clinicians, scientists and multi-disciplinary healthcare teams have the awareness, knowledge and capacity to apply genomics to clinical practice.

Delivering health care closer to home – new provider for adult community health services in Wiltshire announced

Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group has today confirmed its intention to award Wiltshire Health & Care the contract to provide adult community health services in Wiltshire1 for the next five years.

As of July 2016, the services currently provided by Great Western Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, which include, among others, services such as Core Community Teams; Outpatient Department Services; diabetes and fracture clinics will transfer to Wiltshire Health & Care.

Wiltshire Health & Care is a new organisation formed by Great Western Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Salisbury NHS Foundation Trust and Royal United Hospitals Bath NHS Foundation Trust.

Deborah Fielding Accountable Officer for Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group comments:

“As part of the CCG’s five year plan to bring health care closer to home, the changes to adult community health services will ensure that the focus is very much on patient centred care with GP practices firmly at the heart of community provision. Delivered through integrated community teams across the county, Wiltshire Health & Care will support Wiltshire CCG to meet the challenges of an ageing population and to enhance partner working across the health economy to provide a health service fit for tomorrow.”

The contract was awarded to Wiltshire Health & Care following a robust procurement process which adhered to the necessary regulatory and policy requirements. The decision was taken on the recommendation of a Procurement Panel made up of representatives from the CCG, primary and secondary care, lay members and Wiltshire Council and formally ratified at a Governing Body meeting held on 1 December 2015.

Douglas Blair Managing Director Designate, Wiltshire Health & Care comments:

“We’re delighted that Wiltshire Health & Care, an exciting new partnership between Great Western Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Royal United Hospitals Bath NHS Foundation Trust and Salisbury NHS Foundation Trust has been named as the preferred bidder for Adult Community Health Services in Wiltshire. This will mark the start of an exciting period of change, delivering more care closer to local communities, supporting people to maintain independence, reducing reliance on hospital services and removing barriers between different organisations.”

Staff working in areas affected by the change will work for Wiltshire Health & Care as of July 2016 but their employment contracts will remain with Great Western Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust s and there will be no change to pension arrangements and continuation of NHS service.

Further information is available at www.wiltshireccg.nhs.uk.

1 Services provided in Swindon do not form part of the adult community health services in Wiltshire contract

ENDS

Notes for Editors:

Adult Community Health Services refer only to those in Wiltshire. Swindon Adult Community Health Services are not included. The full list of services include:

  • Core Community Teams (inc Care Co-ordinators)
  • Community beds (inc Step up)
  • Community Geriatrician/Frail Elderly Service
  • Stroke Therapies Neurology Stroke
  • Speech and Language Therapy (Salt)
  • Minor injuries unit (MIU)
  • Continence
  • Community Team for People with Learning Disabilities (CTPLD)
  • Hearing Therapies
  • Tissue Viability & Lymphedema
  • Diabetes
  • Dietetics
  • Podiatry
  • Community Outpatient musculoskeletal physiotherapy and Extended Scope Practitioners
  • Orthotics
  • Wheelchairs
  • Cardiac (PACE) and Respiratory Services (COPD)
  • Outpatient Department Services
  • Fracture Clinic

FAQs can be found below.

About Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group

NHS Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) is the commissioner of health care services for the population of Wiltshire.  The CCG is led by local GPs who have first-hand experience of what their patients need.

The CCG consists of 58 GP member practices and works closely with local partners including Wiltshire Council, local NHS providers, patients and the public to manage existing NHS services and implement new services to ensure that high quality health and social care is delivered to the population as close to their home as possible. Further information can be found on the website www.wiltshireccg.nhs.uk

About Wiltshire Health & Care

Wiltshire Health & Care is a new organisation focused solely on community services in Wiltshire. The organisation is a partnership between Great Western Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Royal United Hospitals Bath NHS Foundation Trust and Salisbury NHS Foundation Trust. The Board of Wiltshire Health & Care will include GP provider representatives to ensure a strong primary care voice and lay membership to represent patient and public views.

Further information:

Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group Communications team: Communications.wiltshireccg@nhs.net

Wiltshire Health & Care Ask.wiltshirehealthandcare@gwh.nhs.uk

Frequently Asked Questions

What services make up adult community health services in Wiltshire?    >

Adult community health services in Wiltshire comprise 19 individual services, currently delivered by Great Western Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. These services are:

  • Core Community Teams (inc Care Co-ordinators)
  • Community beds (inc Step up)
  • Community Geriatrician/Frail Elderly Service
  • Stroke Therapies Neurology Stroke
  • Speech and Language Therapy (Salt)
  • Minor injuries unit (MIU)
  • Continence
  • Community Team for People with Learning Disabilities (CTPLD)
  • Hearing Therapies
  • Tissue Viability & Lymphedema
  • Diabetes
  • Dietetics
  • Podiatry
  • Community Outpatient musculoskeletal physiotherapy and Extended Scope Practitioners
  • Orthotics
  • Wheelchairs
  • Cardiac (PACE) and Respiratory Services (COPD)
  • Outpatient Department Services
  • Fracture Clinic

Services are commissioned differently and separately in Swindon, and are not included in our plans.

Why are you re-procuring Adult Community Health Services in Wiltshire?    >

The existing contract with Great Western NHS Hospitals Foundation Trust comes to an end on 30 June 2016. In accordance with NHS procurement policy, Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group is required to seek to appoint the most capable provider of services.

Adult Community Health Services play a crucial role in Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group’s five year plan to transform the way health care in Wiltshire is commissioned. Focusing on patient centred, out of hospital care, the re-procurement of these services will support Wiltshire CCG to meet the health care requirements of people now and in the future.

How long is the contract?    >

The new contract will run for five years with the option to extend for up to a further two years.

Are you cutting any of the services?    >

No, at this time we won’t be cutting any of the current services provided. The changes are all about enabling us to deliver the current services more effectively and efficiently and in line with our out of hospital strategy to deliver more care closer to home.

Will you be reviewing and monitoring the contact?    >

As with all providers we will ensure that we closely monitor service delivery and will have strict quality and performance processes in place to ensure that the expected high service levels are delivered.

How do these new services support local and national plans?    >

Adult Community Services play a crucial role in Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group and indeed NHS England’s five year plan to transform the way health care is commissioned and delivered. Focusing on patient centred, out of hospital care, the re-procurement of these services will support Wiltshire CCG to meet the health care requirements of people now and in the future.

Did you engage with any services users during the procurement process?    >

Yes. A Market Awareness exercise was held in September 2014, followed by a further event for interested providers in January 2015. A public event was held at County Hall in Trowbridge on 23 February 2015. In addition, as part of the development of the service specifications, patients and carers were involved in a number of workshops whilst, clinicians provided expert medical and nursing advice.

What difference will these changes make to me?    >

You will see very little change, you will still have the same access to services.

How have you involved people that use this service when considering changing Adult Community Services?    >

A public event was held at County Hall in Trowbridge on 23 February 2015. In addition, as part of the development of the service specifications, patients and carers were involved in a number of workshops whilst, clinicians provided expert medical and nursing advice.

How can I find out more about how this change will affect me?    >

Please contact your local service delivery lead.

How has the new service provider be chosen?    >

A competitive dialogue procurement process was used, incorporating ‘Pre-Qualification Questionnaire’, ‘Invitation to Submit Outline Proposals’ and ‘Call for Final Tenders’ stages. Competitive dialogue forms part of public sector procurement process under EU legislation.

Commissioners of NHS healthcare must contract with the provider who is most capable of delivering the specified requirements, within the funds available.

What is competitive dialogue?    >

Competitive dialogue is a procurement process that asks bidders to submit proposals in response to a commissioner’s outline requirements, then develop their proposals through dialogue with the commissioner.  Only when their proposals are developed to sufficient detail are tenderers invited to submit final bids.

The competitive dialogue process used for Wiltshire Adult Community Health Service incorporated three main stages: ‘Pre-Qualification Questionnaire’, ‘Invitation to Submit Outline Proposals’ and ‘Call for Final Tender’ stages.

How long has the procurement process taken?    >

All three stages of the procurement process ‘pre-qualification questionnaire’, ‘invitation to submit outline proposals’ and ‘call for final tender’ stages were completed in just over 11 months – January 2015 – December 2015.

What experience will these new providers have?    >

All bidders are required to demonstrate their ability to deliver the services being procured.

Who are Wiltshire Health & Care?    >

Wiltshire Health & Care is a new organisation formed by Great Western Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Salisbury NHS Foundation Trust and Royal United Hospitals Bath NHS Foundation Trust. The organisations currently run hospitals and health care services for the people of Wiltshire and are committed to delivering more care closer to local communities, supporting people to maintain independence, reducing reliance on hospital services and removing barriers between different organisations. The Board of Wiltshire Health & Care will include GP provider representatives to ensure a strong primary care voice and lay membership to represent patient and public views.

What is a 10 day standstill period and why is it needed?    >

The standstill period provides for a short (at least 10 calendar days) pause between the point when the contract award decision is notified to bidders, and the final contract conclusion, during which time suppliers can challenge the decision.

What is the mobilisation stage and how long will it take?    >

Contract mobilisation is the time allocated following a procurement exercise before commencement of the service delivery. The mobilisation phase for adult community services is approximately seven months.

Do you have questions about what the changes to Community Children’s Health Services in Wiltshire might mean to you?

If you’re a parent carer of a child or young person with a disability or special educational needs, come to a Question and Answer session and get a better understanding of what the changes may mean to you.

  • Monday 7th December, 10:00am – 12:00pm
    Fairfield Farm College Conference Venue, 43 High Street,
    Dilton Marsh, Westbury, BA13 4DL
  • Tuesday 8th December, 10:00am – 12:00pm
    Bemerton Heath Neighbourhood Centre, 58-60 Pinewood Way,
    Salisbury, SP2 9HU

To attend one of these sessions, you must book a place. You can book by:

If you’d like to ask a question, but can’t attend a session, you can submit your question to the panel here.