Community Child Health Services

Community Child Health Services in Wiltshire – The Way Forward

What are Community Child Services?

Children’s Community Health Services are a group of 14 different services for children:

  • Health Visiting Service
  • Family Nurse Partnership
  • School Nursing and National Child Measurement programme
  • School-aged immunisation programme
  • Children’s Learning Disability Nursing
  • Integrated Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy
  • Speech and Language Therapy
  • Children’s Community Nursing
  • Community Paediatrics
  • Community Paediatric Audiology (West Wiltshire only)
  • Safeguarding Named Nurses
  • Looked After Children
  • Portage (Salisbury area only)
  • Child Health Information Service (CHIS)

In Wiltshire, these services are currently delivered by five separate organisations.

Creating a single Community Child Health Service for Wiltshire

As a result of listening to, consulting and involving service users, it has been determined that services and support for the county’s children and young people can be delivered more consistently and equitably through the delivery of services via a single contract, creating a service model for a single Community Child Health Service.

Consistent and equitable community health and support for Wiltshire’s children and young people

Wiltshire CCG, Wiltshire Council and NHS England are jointly re-commissioning the services to create a single Community Child Health Service for Wiltshire. It will mean that every child, young person and their family across the county, no matter where they live, will have access to the same level of services and support. Services will be easier to access and there will be a potential for improved joint work with GPs, Wiltshire Council and other partners.

Thank you for helping shape your new service

Service users have been at the heart of consultation and engagement on this new service. As well as public events there have been regular meetings, workshops, children and young people and parent/carer focus groups and on-line surveys. The new service, to be in place for April 2016, will deliver consistent and equitable levels of service and support throughout Wiltshire that is shaped by you.

Further information: Public presentation: The Way Forward. 18 November 2014.

Any questions?

Please feel free to contact Wiltshire CCG’s Communications team on 01380 736010 or email us

The Vision
The Wiltshire Children & Young People’s Plan sets out the Joint vision of improving outcomes for children and young people in Wiltshire; promoting safeguarding; reducing, preventing and mitigating the effects of child poverty; and enabling resilient individuals, families and communities.

To deliver this vision within Community Child Health Services we will make sure that children and young people in Wiltshire have the best possible start in life by the delivery of an over-arching model of Community Child Health service that delivers accessible, high quality services meeting the identified needs of children, young people and families.

Survey Update

Thank you to all those who have taken part in our online surveys – your input has been invaluable. We’ve listened to all your thoughts, comments and suggestions and they have helped shape the new service.

Please note that Community Child Health Services in Wiltshire exclude those provided in Swindon

PRESS RELEASE from Public Health England

Change4Life Sugar Swaps roadshow to visit Bristol this weekend 

Event aims to highlight simple sugar swaps parents can make to their family’s diet

The Change4Life roadshow is set to visit Cabot Circus this weekend on Sunday 1 February to raise awareness of the high levels of sugar families consume every day, and to offer parents practical advice on how to cut down on sugar consumption by making one or more simple swaps.

While guidelines state that no more than 10% of a person’s daily energy or calorie intake should be made up of sugar[i], at present, children aged 4-10 years are consuming up to 50% more than this[ii].

Eating and drinking too much sugar means extra calories, which causes fat to build up inside the body. This can lead to heart disease, some cancers or type 2 diabetes later in life.

Recently published data highlights that approximately one in five children aged 4-5 years old and one in three children aged 10-11 years old is overweight or obese[iii].

Sugar can also have a devastating impact upon dental health, an integral part of overall health. Tooth decay was the most common reason for hospital admissions for children aged five to nine in 2012-13. 28% of 5 year olds in England have tooth decay and of these, 24% have five or more teeth affected[iv].

Furthermore, a new survey amongst Netmums users found that nearly half (47%) of mums surveyed think their family has too much sugar in their diets[v] and two thirds of mums (67%) are worried about the amount of sugar their children consume.5

Mark Patterson, Health and Wellbeing Programme Leader for the Avon, Gloucestershire and Wiltshire Public Health England Centre said:

“Reducing sugar intake is important for the health of our children both now and in the future. We are all eating too much sugar and the impact this has on our health is evident.

“This campaign is about taking small steps to address this. We know from past campaigns that making simple swaps works and makes a real difference. This year we wanted to be even more single minded in our approach, which is why we are focusing on sugar alone.

“The family challenge highlights that simple swaps could lead to big changes if sustained over time and we’d urge parents in Bristol to come along to the Sugar Swaps roadshow this weekend, learn more about Sugar Swaps and sign up for their free pack full of swap suggestions.”

The Change4Life Sugar Swaps roadshow will consist of a number of interactive, fun and informative activities to teach families about the swaps; including:

  • Kitchen zone: A fun zone for all the family which reveals the surprising amount of sugar in food and drinks that kids have at different times of the day, such as at breakfast and after school.
  • The Funny Face photo board: A place where visitors can be photographed in funny poses and encouraged to put their photos across social media.
  • Sign Up Zone: An area where families can register for their FREE Sugar Swaps packs. The packs are filled with hints, tips and recipe suggestions, plus money-off vouchers, swap cards and stickers.

Change4Life recommends four simple Sugar Swaps to choose from, tackling different ‘sugar occasions’ in the day:

  • The Breakfast Swap: sugary cereal for plain cereal e.g. wholewheat biscuit cereal
  • The Drink Swap: e.g. from sugary drinks to sugar-free or no-added-sugar drinks
  • The After School Swap: for example from muffins to fruited teacake
  • The Pudding Swap: for example from ice cream to low-fat lower-sugar yoghurt.

References

[i]Department of Health (1991). Dietary Reference Values for Food Energy and Nutrients for the United Kingdom Report of the Panel on Dietary Reference Values of the Committee on Medical Aspects of Food Policy. Report on Health and Social Subjects 41. London. HMSO.

[ii] Department of Health (1991). Dietary Reference Values for Food Energy and Nutrients for the United Kingdom Report of the Panel on Dietary Reference Values of the Committee on Medical Aspects of Food Policy. Report on Health and Social Subjects 41. London. HMSO.

[iii] National Child Measurement Programme 2014 http://www.hscic.gov.uk/catalogue/PUB16070/nati-chil-meas-prog-eng-2013-2014-rep.pdf

[iv] National Dental Epidemiology Programme for England: oral health survey of five year old children 2012.

[v] Online survey conducted with 687 parents of children aged 5-11 & 1720 parents of children of all ages, October 2104 netmums.com

Be Clear on Cancer campaign in Wiltshire to raise awareness that ongoing heartburn can be a sign of cancer

Latest data reveals around 530 people in Avon, Gloucestershire and Wiltshire are diagnosed with oesophago-gastric cancers each year.

A ‘Be Clear on Cancer’ campaign in Wiltshire urging people from the area to visit their doctor if they have heartburn most days for three weeks or more, as this can be a sign of oesophageal or stomach cancer.

The campaign launch coincides with results of a new survey commissioned by Public Health England, which reveals that nationally, only 1 in 2 people (55%) would visit their doctor if they experience the above symptom.

The most recent data has revealed that in Avon, Gloucestershire and Wiltshire, around 530 people are diagnosed with oesophageal or stomach cancer each year and approximately 438 people die from these diseases annually.

Early diagnosis of oesophageal or stomach cancer (also known as oesophago-gastric cancers) is crucial and means treatment is more likely to be successful. Nationally, around 67% of people diagnosed with oesophago-gastric cancers at the earliest stage survive for at least five years. This figure drops to around 3% for those diagnosed at a late stage.

According to the survey, 59% of respondents did not know that heartburn could be a sign of cancer with just 15% saying they were certain that it is a symptom.

Another symptom highlighted by the campaign is that of difficulty swallowing food. Here the survey found that 70% did not know food sticking in the throat could be a sign of cancer and just 13% of those surveyed said they were sure it is a symptom.

Dr Shona Arora, Centre Director for the Avon, Gloucestershire and Wiltshire Public Health England Centre, explains the importance of this campaign:

“People may be reluctant to visit their doctor about persistent heartburn, thinking that it’s something they just have to live with. But heartburn most days for three weeks or more could be a sign of cancer.

“The earlier cancer is diagnosed, the higher the chance of survival. If we’re to improve early diagnosis rates, we need to encourage people with symptoms to go to their doctor, which is what this latest Be Clear on Cancer campaign aims to do.”

It has been estimated that around 950 lives could be saved in England each year if our survival rates for oesophago-gastric cancers matched the best in Europe.

Of those diagnosed with oesophago-gastric cancers, more than 9 out of 10 people are over the age of 50,0 making this the target age group for the campaign.

The four-week campaign will see adverts running nationally throughout England on TV, radio and in the press.

A local roadshow will also be visiting the Broadwalk Centre in Knowle, Bristol on Monday 23 and Tuesday 24 February to raise awareness of oesophago-gastric cancers.

For further information about the signs and symptoms of oesophageal and stomach cancers, please visit www.nhs.uk/ogcancer

For more information, see this page

 

PRESS RELEASE: Thursday, 15 January 2015

INTEGRATION OF BATH HOSPITALS

As the proposed acquisition of the Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases (RNHRD) – or ‘The Min,’ by the Royal United Hospitals Bath NHS Foundation Trust (RUH) moves closer, NHS Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) Chairman, Dr Stephen Rowlands, comments:

“As one of the commissioners of RNHRD’s services, we are pleased that the acquisition is progressing as planned; there will be benefits to patients as well as to both hospitals.”

Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group commissions the healthcare services for almost half a million people within Wiltshire. This includes general and specialist hospital services in Bath, Salisbury and Swindon as well as a wide range of further hospital and community health related services throughout the county.

Dr Rowlands, continued, “The proposed acquisition will ensure continuity of the highly regarded specialist services which RNHRD provides. The RNHRD is renowned internationally for its rheumatology, pain and fatigue services. We are fully reassured that, moving forward, patient care will not only be maintained but enhanced, too.”

Wiltshire CCG will continue to work with RNHRD, RUH and neighbouring CCGs as the acquisition progresses, and is confident that there will be no disruption of service to patients.

The Board and Governors of both the RNHRD and RUH have formally approved the proposal. Subject to the approval of Monitor (the sector regulator for Health Services), the acquisition could take place early in 2015.

ENDS

Further information:

Sarah Tranter or Lynsey Thorp, Communications, NHS Wiltshire CCG.
T. 01380 736010
E. communications.wiltshireccg@nhs.net

Notes for Editors:

  • NHS Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) is the commissioner of health care services for the population of Wiltshire. The CCG is led by local GPs who have first-hand experience of what their patients need.
  • The CCG consists of 58 GP member practices and works closely with local partners including Wiltshire Council, local NHS providers, patients and the public to manage existing NHS services and implement new services to ensure that high quality health and social care is delivered to the population as close to their home as possible. Further information can be found on the website www.wiltshireccg.nhs.uk
  • The RNHRD NHS FT is a national specialist rehabilitation and rheumatology hospital based in Bath. Offering services to adults, children and young people, the trust has expertise in general and complex:
    • Rheumatological conditions
    • Chronic pain management including Complex Regional Pain Syndrome
    • Fatigue Management (CFS/ME and cancer survivorship fatigue)
    • The RNHRD has an excellent reputation for research both nationally and internationally. Research informs their treatment programmes and contributes to a better understanding of many of the conditions in which they specialise
  • More information can be found online at www.ruh.nhs.uk/about/ and www.rnhrd.nhs.uk/about-us

Press Release from RUH and The Min

Happy New Year to one and all

Steve-Rowlands-2014_WEBAnd what an interesting one we have to look forward to; with a forthcoming election and the NHS already being used as a political football.

As we will all be aware, the NHS has seen unprecedented levels of activity with Accident and Emergency departments across the country working beyond their capacity, ambulance services stretched beyond belief and primary care creaking at the front door.

And why is this happening? Well…

Between Christmas and the New Year, I took the family to a local cinema and followed it up with a pizza. As I was getting stuck into my Firenzi, I was interrupted by the noise of a siren and blue flashing lights pulling up at the front door of the restaurant.

A paramedic jumped out the ambulance, rushed into the restaurant and was directed over to a lady sitting at a table behind us eating her meal and who seemed to be perfectly happy. She was escorted into the back of the ambulance and 30 minutes later came back in to finish off her meal eventually leaving the building laughing and joking with her partner.

I was astonished at this. Not only would this have incurred a cost of at least £276, it tied up two highly-skilled professionals for probably the best part of an hour, during one of the busiest times of the year.

My kids could not believe what they had just witnessed and were even more astounded when we got home that night and put the TV on to be greeted with a news report on how stretched the ambulance service in the South West is and how they were not managing to respond to urgent calls.

Was this event a symptom of why the whole system is in overload?

I suspect the answer is yes, but no, but…

On chatting to colleagues in our three District General Hospitals there have clearly been a lot of very sick elderly people seen and admitted over the last three weeks. However the A&E departments were also overloaded by people who could and should have been treated elsewhere.

If, as a nation, we want to maintain an NHS that is free at the point of delivery, we have to treat it with the respect that it deserves and not waste people’s valuable time and expertise.

I wonder if this particular lady would have been as eager to call for an ambulance if she subsequently received a bill for £276…

National Study on Flooding and Health – Wiltshire residents asked to participate

Public Health England (PHE) is to conduct the first ever long-term study into the impact of flooding on health and wellbeing.

As part of the national study, PHE will be in contact with flood affected residents across the country.

From today (Monday 12 January 2015), supported by Wiltshire Council, PHE is asking a sample of householders in Wiltshire affected by the severe flooding last winter to complete a health questionnaire.

PHE wants to hear from people directly affected by flooding, those whose lives were disrupted and in order to compare the possible impacts of the flooding, they also want to hear from those in the area that were unaffected.

If you get a questionnaire, please don’t ignore it. By completing and returning it, you will be helping PHE understand the possible impacts of flooding on health.

Dr Isabel Oliver, Director of Field Epidemiology Service at Public Health England and co-ordinator of the study, said:

“This is the first ever long term study into the impact of flooding on health and wellbeing. We are writing to households across the country and we very much hope that people will return our questionnaire and join this important study.

“So, if you receive a letter from Public Health England inviting you to take part in this important study, please help us to build a picture of how the floods affected people’s lives by completing it and returning it to us.

“It only takes 20 minutes and your participation in this research project could be crucial.”

Dr James Rubin, Senior Lecturer at King’s College London, said:

“We know that being flooded can sometimes have a serious effect on someone’s wellbeing. But there are still so many uncertainties about what the impacts of flooding are.

“We really need people in Wiltshire to help us understand these issues, so we can find ways to better protect and help people in the future.”

Heather Shepherd, Flood Community & Recovery support specialist from the National Flood Forum, said:

“As all those who have been flooded will know only too well, flooding is devastating, the anxiety can be unbearable and the process of your home being repaired is often worse than the flooding itself.

“Once you have experienced flooding you live in constant fear of it happening again which impacts on people being able to live their lives in an ordinary fashion.

“We wholeheartedly welcome this long term study into the effect flooding has on health and wellbeing. We would encourage people to take part as the findings will hopefully start to give an understanding of the distressing impact that flooding has on lives.”

Maggie Rae, corporate director at Wiltshire Council, said: 

“Wiltshire has been hard hit by flooding in the recent past and we work very closely with local communities on flood prevention measures and also ensuring that appropriate financial support is available to those affected.

“We know that the devastating impact of flooding can bring with it a knock on effect on health and wellbeing. I’d urge people to complete this survey to help build a better overall picture of the full impact of flooding.”

 

Wiltshire Joint Mental Health and Wellbeing Strategy
Draft for consultation

Mental health is ‘everybody’’s business’ and poor mental health can have a devastating impact on the quality of life for everyone involved as well as have a significant impact on the national economy.

The draft Wiltshire Mental Health and Wellbeing Strategy provides the strategic direction for Wiltshire Council and NHS Wiltshire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) in promoting mental health and wellbeing and supporting people with mental health problems and their carers over the next seven years.

The aim of the Strategy is to create environments and communities that will keep people well across their lifetime, achieving and sustaining good mental health and wellbeing for all. It focuses around six outcomes:
  • More people will have good mental health
  • More people with mental health problems will recover
  • More people with mental health problems will have good physical health
  • More people will have a positive experience of care and support
  • Fewer people will suffer avoidable harm
  • Fewer people will experience stigma and discrimination
Wiltshire CCG and Wiltshire Council would like your views on the consultation document and encourage you to complete a questionnaire as part of the consultation process. Should you wish to feedback in a different way, we would welcome your suggestions about how you would like to do this either by email PublicHealth@wiltshire.gov.uk or by telephone to Karen Spence 01225 713094.

New Change4Life campaign encourages families in Wiltshire to make Sugar Swaps

New data reveals 31% (6,850 children) in their last year of primary school in  Wiltshire are already overweight or obese.

A new Change4Life campaign has been launched by Public Health England to encourage parents to cut down the amount of sugar their children consume by making one or more simple swaps.

Eating and drinking too much sugar means extra calories, which causes fat to build up inside the body. This can lead to heart disease, some cancers or type 2 diabetes later in life.

Sugar can also have a devastating impact upon dental health, an integral part of overall health. Tooth decay was the most common reason for hospital admissions for children aged five to nine in 2012-13. 28% of 5 year olds in England have tooth decay and of these, 24% have five or more teeth affected. When children are not healthy this affects their ability to learn, thrive and develop.

Across Wiltshire 22.1% (1,076) children start school either overweight or obese, which then becomes 29.7% (1,326) for those in their last year of school.

Children who are overweight or obese when they are young are far more likely to become overweight or obese adults and these figures demonstrate the increasing need to address children’s diet and limit future health problems.

While guidelines state that no more that 10% of a person’s daily energy or calorie intake should be made up of sugar, at present, children aged 4-10 years are consuming up to 50% more than this. Children aged 4-10 get 17% of their daily sugar from soft drinks; 17% from biscuits, buns, cakes, pastries and fruit pies, 14% from confectionery, 13% from fruit juice, and 8% from breakfast cereals.

Change4Life Sugar Swaps launches following a new survey amongst Netmums users who were polled on their views on sugar. The results highlight that nearly half (47%) of mums surveyed think their family has too much sugar in their diets and two thirds of mums (67%) are worried about the amount of sugar their children consume6 .

Change4Life recommends four simple Sugar Swaps for mums to choose from, tackling different ‘sugar occasions’ in the day:

  • The Breakfast Swap: sugary cereal for plain cereal e.g. wholewheat biscuit cereal
  • The Drink Swap: e.g. from sugary drinks to sugar-free or no-added-sugar drinks
  • The After School Swap: for example from muffins to fruited teacake
  • The Pudding Swap: for example from ice cream to low-fat lower-sugar yoghurt

To understand the sugar issue from mums’ perspective, Public Health England partnered up with Netmums and the University of Reading to deliver a ‘Family Sugar Challenge’. A unique activity that involved 50 families, 24 of which were selected based on their geographical location for the initial analysis.

The diets of the families were analysed in terms of sugar content, before and during the Change4Life’s Sugar Swaps. This early analysis yielded surprising results:

  • On average the families were consuming 483g of sugar a day at the beginning of the challenge
  • Their sugar intake was reduced to 287g per day when making Sugar Swaps
  • This meant an average daily saving of 196g of sugar per family each day, or 49 sugar cubes

Mark Patterson, Health and Wellbeing Programme Leader for the Avon, Gloucestershire and Wiltshire PHE Centre said:

“Reducing sugar intake is important for the health of our children both now and in the future. We are all eating too much sugar and the impact this has on our health is evident.

“This campaign is about taking small steps to address this. We know from past campaigns that making simple swaps works and makes a real difference. This year we wanted to be even more single minded in our approach, which is why we are focusing on sugar alone.

“The family challenge highlights that simple swaps could lead to big changes if sustained over time and we’d urge parents in Avon Gloucestershire and Wiltshire to try one more simple swap in January and beyond.”

Cathy Court, founder of Netmums said:

“We know that mums want to provide a healthy diet for their children but balancing a number of competing priorities, including healthy eating, can be tricky. Although sugar consumption is a worry for parents, we understand that taking steps to reduce sugar can be really difficult.  We hope that these simple Sugar Swaps from Change4Life will make it easier for parents to reduce their family’s sugar intake.”

Change4Life Sugar Swaps will launch on January 5th with television, radio, digital and out of home advertising, with an email support programme and a national road show visiting 10 locations and will visit Bristol’s Cabot Circus on Sunday 1 February 2015.

Change4Life Sugar Swaps is supported by Asda, Tesco, Co-op, Aldi, Coca-Cola (Diet Coke and Coke Zero), Morrisons, mySupermarket, and the Lead Association for Catering in Education (LACA).

Throughout the campaign, families will be able to register for their FREE Sugar Swaps pack, which they will receive through the post. The packs are filled with hints, tips and recipe suggestions designed to help parents cut down the sugary foods and drinks consumed by their children, plus money-off vouchers, swap cards and stickers. To sign up, families just need to search Change4Life and register.

Great Western Hospital has issued a press release about the current pressures on services at the hospital.

The full press release can be found here.